Nobelpreisträger meldet sich zu Wort: Japans Professor für Physiologie der Medizin, Professor Dr. Tasuku Honjo, sorgte heute vor den Medien für Aufsehen, als er sagte, das Coronavirus sei nicht natürlich. Wenn es natürlich wäre, hätte es die ganze Welt nicht so negativ beeinflusst. Weil die Temperatur naturgemäß in verschiedenen Ländern unterschiedlich ist. Wenn es natürlich wäre, hätte es nur die Länder mit der gleichen Temperatur wie China nachteilig beeinflusst. Stattdessen breitet es sich in einem Land wie der Schweiz aus, genauso wie es sich in den Wüstengebieten ausbreitet. Wenn es natürlich wäre, hätte es sich an kalten Orten ausgebreitet, wäre aber an heißen Orten gestorben. Ich habe 40 Jahre lang an Tieren und Viren geforscht. Es ist nicht natürlich. Es wird hergestellt und das Virus ist vollständig künstlich. Ich habe 4 Jahre im Wuhan Labor in China gearbeitet. Ich bin mit allen Mitarbeitern dieses Labors bestens vertraut. Ich habe sie alle nach dem Corona-Unfall angerufen. Aber alle ihre Telefone sind seit 3 ​​Monaten tot. Es versteht sich nun, dass all diese Labortechniker gestorben sind. Nach all meinem Wissen und meiner Forschung bis heute kann ich dies mit 100%-iger Sicherheit sagen, dass Corona nicht natürlich ist. Es ist nicht von Fledermäusen gekommen. China hat es hergestellt. Wenn sich das, was ich heute sage, jetzt oder sogar nach meinem Tod als falsch herausstellt, kann die Regierung meinen Nobelpreis zurückziehen. Aber China lügt und diese Wahrheit wird eines Tages allen offenbart werden. “

Japans Professor für Physiologie der Medizin, Professor Dr. Tasuku Honjo, sorgte heute vor den Medien für Aufsehen, als er sagte, das Coronavirus sei nicht natürlich.

Wenn es natürlich wäre, hätte es die ganze Welt nicht so negativ beeinflusst.

Weil die Temperatur naturgemäß in verschiedenen Ländern unterschiedlich ist. Wenn es natürlich wäre, hätte es nur die Länder mit der gleichen Temperatur wie China nachteilig beeinflusst.

Stattdessen breitet es sich in einem Land wie der Schweiz aus, genauso wie es sich in den Wüstengebieten ausbreitet. Wenn es natürlich wäre, hätte es sich an kalten Orten ausgebreitet, wäre aber an heißen Orten gestorben.

Ich habe 40 Jahre lang an Tieren und Viren geforscht. Es ist nicht natürlich. Es wird hergestellt und das Virus ist vollständig künstlich.

Ich habe 4 Jahre im Wuhan Labor in China gearbeitet. Ich bin mit allen Mitarbeitern dieses Labors bestens vertraut. Ich habe sie alle nach dem Corona-Unfall angerufen. Aber alle ihre Telefone sind seit 3 ​​Monaten tot. Es versteht sich nun, dass all diese Labortechniker gestorben sind.

Nach all meinem Wissen und meiner Forschung bis heute kann ich dies mit 100%-iger Sicherheit sagen, dass Corona nicht natürlich ist. Es ist nicht von Fledermäusen gekommen. China hat es hergestellt.

Wenn sich das, was ich heute sage, jetzt oder sogar nach meinem Tod als falsch herausstellt, kann die Regierung meinen Nobelpreis zurückziehen.

Aber China lügt und diese Wahrheit wird eines Tages allen offenbart werden. “

 

https:/en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tasuku_Honjo

Tasuku Honjo

Tasuku Honjo (本庶 äHonjo Tasuku, born January 27, 1942)[1] is a Japanese physician-scientist and immunologist. He shared the 2018 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology and is best known for his identification of programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1).[2] He is also known for his molecular identification of cytokinesIL-4 and IL-5,[3] as well as the discovery of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) that is essential for class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation.[4]

Tasuku Honjo
Tasuku Honjo 201311.jpg
Born 27 January 1942 (age 78)

Education Kyoto University (BSMDPhD)
Known for Class switch recombination
IL-4IL-5AID
Cancer immunotherapy
PD-1
Awards Imperial Prize (1996)
Koch Prize (2012)
Order of Culture (2013)
Tang Prize (2014)
Kyoto Prize (2016)
Alpert Prize (2017)
Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (2018)
Scientific career
Fields Molecular Immunology
Institutions Kyoto University
Doctoral advisor Yasutomi Nishizuka
Osamu Hayaishi
Notable students Shizuo Akira

He was elected as a foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences, USA (2001), as a member of German Academy of Natural Scientists Leopoldina (2003), and also as a member of the Japan Academy (2005).

In 2018, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine along with James P. Allison.[5] He and Allison together had won the 2014 Tang Prize in Biopharmaceutical Science for the same achievement.[6]

Life and careerEdit

at Nobel press conference in Stockholm, December 2018

Honjo was born in Kyoto in 1942. He completed his M.D. degree in 1966 from the Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, where in 1975 he received his Ph.D. degree in Medical Chemistry under the supervision of Yasutomi Nishizuka and Osamu Hayaishi.[7]

Honjo was a visiting fellow at the Department of Embryology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, from 1971 to 1973. He then moved to the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, where he studied the genetic basis for the immune response at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development as a fellow between 1973 and 1977, followed by many years as an NIH Fogarty Scholar in Residence starting in 1992. During part of this time, Honjo also was an assistant professor at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, between 1974 and 1979; a professor in the Department of Genetics, Osaka University School of Medicine, between 1979 and 1984; and professor in the Department of Medical Chemistry, Kyoto University Faculty of Medicine, from 1984 to 2005. Since 2005 Honjo has been a professor in Department of Immunology and Genomic Medicine, Kyoto University Faculty of Medicine.[7] He was the President of Shizuoka Prefecture Public University Corporation from 2012 to 2017. He also worked with a veteran physician of India Dr. Manish Ranjan and Chief Economist Dr. Sadab Alam and Sujeet Kumar for quite some time to contribute in the field of medicine.

He is a member of Japanese Society for Immunology and served as its President between 1999 and 2000. Honjo is also an honorary member of American Association of Immunologists.[8] In 2017 he became Deputy Director-General and Distinguished Professor of Kyoto University Institute for Advanced Study (KUIAS).[9]

ContributionEdit

Cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation (CTLA4, PD1)

Honjo has established the basic conceptual framework of class switch recombination.[4] He presented a model explaining antibody gene rearrangement in class switch and, between 1980 and 1982, verified its validity by elucidating its DNA structure.[10] He succeeded in cDNA clonings of IL-4[11] and IL-5[12] cytokines involved in class switching and IL-2 receptor alpha chain in 1986, and went on further to discover AID[13] in 2000, demonstrating its importance in class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation.

In 1992, Honjo first identified PD-1 as an inducible gene on activated T-lymphocytes, and this discovery significantly contributed to the establishment of cancer immunotherapy principle by PD-1 blockade.[14]

AwardsEdit

Shun’ichi IwasakiKen TakakuraSeikaku TakagiSusumu Nakanishi and Honjo received the Order of Culture from Emperor Akihito on November 3, 2013. After that they posed for photo with Shinzō Abe at the East Garden of the Imperial Palace.

With Masuo Aizawa on August 26, 2010.

Honjo has received several awards and honors in his life. In 2016, he won the Kyoto Prize in Basic Sciences for „Discovery of the Mechanism Responsible for the Functional Diversification of Antibodies, Immunoregulatory Molecules and Clinical Applications of PD-1“. In 2018, he shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with American immunologist James P. Allison. They previously also shared the Tang Prize in Biopharmaceutical Science in 2014.[5][9]

The other major awards and honors received by Honjo are:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ „Tasuku Honjo – Facts – 2018“NobelPrize.org. Nobel Media AB. 1 October 2018. Retrieved 5 October 2018.
  2. ^ Ishida, Y.; Agata, Y.; Shibahara, K.; Honjo, T. (1992). „Induced expression of PD-1, a novel member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily, upon programmed cell death“The EMBO Journal. Wiley. 11 (11): 3887–3895. doi:10.1002/j.1460-2075.1992.tb05481.xISSN 0261-4189PMC 556898PMID 1396582.
  3. ^ Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Ogata, Masato (2010-03-25). „The study of cytokines by Japanese researchers: a historical perspective“International Immunology22 (5): 341–345. doi:10.1093/intimm/dxq022ISSN 0953-8178PMID 20338911. Retrieved 2018-10-01.
  4. a b „Robert Koch Stiftung – Christine Goffinet“www.robert-koch-stiftung.de.
  5. a b Hannah, Devlin (October 2018). „James P Allison and Tasuku Honjo win Nobel prize for medicine“. The Guardian. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  6. ^ „2014 Tang Prize in Biopharmaceutical Science“Archivedfrom the original on 2017-10-20. Retrieved 2016-06-18.
  7. a b „免疫のしくみに魅せられて-äごとにもää的に挑む“ (in Japanese).
  8. ^ „AAI Members Awarded the 2018 Nobel Prizein Physiology or Medicine“. The American Association of Immunologists. Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  9. a b c d e f g h i „Tasuku Honjo“kyotoprize.org. Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  10. ^ Shimizu, Akira; Takahashi, Naoki; Yaoita, Yoshio; Honjo, Tasuku (1982). „Organization of the constant-region gene family of the mouse immunoglobulin heavy chain“. Cell. Elsevier BV. 28 (3): 499–506. doi:10.1016/0092-8674(82)90204-5ISSN 0092-8674PMID 6804095.
  11. ^ Noma, Yoshihiko; Sideras, Paschalis; Naito, Takayuki; Bergstedt-Lindquist, Susanne; Azuma, Chihiro; et al. (1986). „Cloning of cDNA encoding the murine IgG1 induction factor by a novel strategy using SP6 promoter“. Nature. Springer Nature. 319 (6055): 640–646. Bibcode:1986Natur.319..640Ndoi:10.1038/319640a0ISSN 0028-0836PMID 3005865.
  12. ^ Kinashi, Tatsuo; Harada, Nobuyuki; Severinson, Eva; Tanabe, Toshizumi; Sideras, Paschalis; et al. (1986). „Cloning of complementary DNA encoding T-cell replacing factor and identity with B-cell growth factor II“. Nature. Springer Nature. 324 (6092): 70–73. Bibcode:1986Natur.324…70Kdoi:10.1038/324070a0ISSN 0028-0836PMID 3024009.
  13. ^ Muramatsu, Masamichi; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Yamada, Shuichi; Shinkai, Yoichi; Honjo, Tasuku (2000). „Class Switch Recombination and Hypermutation Require Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID), a Potential RNA Editing Enzyme“. Cell. Elsevier BV. 102 (5): 553–563. doi:10.1016/s0092-8674(00)00078-7ISSN 0092-8674PMID 11007474.
  14. ^ „The Keio Medical Science Prize Laureates 2016“. Ms-fund.keio.ac.jp. Retrieved 2018-10-01.
  15. ^ „The Asahi Prize [Fiscal 1981]“. The Asahi Shimbun Company. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  16. a b c d e „Tasuko Hanjo“. Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  17. ^ „The Imperial Prize,Japan Academy Prize,Duke of Edinburgh Prize Recipients“japan-acad.go.jp. The Japan Academy. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  18. ^ „Person of Cultural Merit“osaka-u.ac.jp. Osaka University. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  19. ^ „Kyoto Prize, Inamori Foundation“Kyoto Prize, Inamori Foundation. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  20. ^ „The 2016 Keio Medical Science Prize Laureate“ms-fund.keio.ac.jp. Keio University. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  21. ^ „2016 Fudan-Zhongzhi Science Award Announcement“fdsif.fudan.edu.cn. Fudan Science and Innovation Forum. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  22. ^ „Hall of Citation Laureates“clarivate.com. Clarivate Analytics. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  23. ^ „Warren Alpert Foundation Prize Recipients“warrenalpert.org. Warren Alpert Foundation. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  24. ^ „All Nobel Prizes“. Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 3 October2018.
Share Button

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.