„Verfehlungen“ und das undurchsichtige Spinnennetz der Giebelkreuz-Krake Raiffeisen / Schattenregierung Österreich! – „FALSCHE WECHSEL, ECHTE GAUNER“ „…WECHSEL & WAFFEN…“

★★★ Widerstandsberichterstattung über die herrschenden, demokratischen Um- bzw. Zustände ★★★

Finanzmarkt- und Konzernmacht-Zeitalter der Plutokratie unterstützt von der Mediakratie in den Lobbykraturen der Geld-regiert-Regierungen in Europa, Innsbruck am 15.02.2015

Liebe® Blogleser_in,

Bewusstheit, Liebe und Friede sei mit uns allen und ein gesundes sinnerfülltes Leben wünsch ich ebenfalls.

Aus dieser Quelle zur weiteren Verbreitung entnommen: http://bankenindieschranken.blogspot.co.at/2015/02/not-to-forget-raiffeisen-one-of-many.html 

NOT TO FORGET – RAIFFEISEN – one of the many strange connections – RosUkrEnergo U.S. Investigated

 
what considers Raiffeisen is NEVER investigated by Austria and everything is just too little known…very quick they „pull out and sell“…!
„FALSCHE WECHSEL, ECHTE GAUNER“
„…WECHSEL & WAFFEN…“

Unfassbar – Raiffeisen Werbung Ungarn … spricht fuer sich … SEHENSWERT!

http://bankenindieschranken.blogspot.com/2014/10/unfassbar-raiffeisenbank-werbung-ungarn.html

U.S. Investigates Critical Supplier Of Russian Gas

Europe’s Energy Security Is at Heart of Concerns; Opaque Ownership Queried

by GLENN R. SIMPSON and
 

DAVID CRAWFORD – THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT IS INVESTIGATING ROSUKRENERGO AG, THE COMPANY THAT SUPPLIES BILLIONS OF DOLLARS IN RUSSIAN AND CENTRAL ASIAN NATURAL GAS TO UKRAINE, ACCORDING TO PEOPLE IN EUROPE AND THE U.S. WITH KNOWLEDGE OF THE INQUIRY.
REPRESENTATIVES OF SWISS-REGISTERED ROSUKRENERGO AND OF RAIFFEISEN INVESTMENT AG, A SUBSIDIARY OF VIENNA-BASED RAIFFEISEN BANK AG THAT HOLDS 50% OF ROSUKRENERGO’S SHARES FOR UNDISCLOSED OWNERS, MET RECENTLY WITH INVESTIGATORS FROM THE DEPARTMENT’S ORGANIZED-CRIME SECTION AT JUSTICE DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS IN WASHINGTON, THESE PEOPLE SAID. THEY DISCUSSED THE COMPANY’S OPAQUE OWNERSHIP, THOUGH FURTHER DETAILS OF WHAT HAS DRAWN THE ATTENTION OF U.S. OFFICIALS REMAIN UNCLEAR.
SPOKESMEN FOR RAIFFEISEN AND ROSUKRENERGO DECLINED TO COMMENT. DREW WADE, A JUSTICE DEPARTMENT SPOKESMAN IN WASHINGTON, SAID HE COULDN’T CONFIRM OR DENY THE EXISTENCE OF A CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION.
ROSUKRENERGO, WHOSE CLOUDY WORKINGS AND OWNERSHIP STRUCTURE HAVE BEEN ATTACKED AS A THREAT TO EUROPE’S ENERGY SECURITY AND UKRAINE’S POLITICAL STABILITY, IS NOW RECONSIDERING PLANS FOR A PUBLIC SHARE OFFERING THAT WOULD HAVE REQUIRED DISCLOSURE OF THE COMPANY’S TRUE OWNERS, PEOPLE CLOSE TO THE COMPANY SAID. THE OTHER HALF OF ROSUKRENERGO IS OWNED BY OAO GAZPROM, THE STATE-CONTROLLED RUSSIAN GAS TITAN. OFFICIALS FROM GAZPROM, RUSSIA AND UKRAINE HAVE DENIED THEY KNOW THE IDENTITIES OF THE SHAREHOLDERS BEHIND THE RAIFFEISEN STAKE.
The latest developments for the company — which has become a political issue in Ukraine and has drawn concern from Western government officials — are likely to heighten concerns among Western nations about the reliability of Russian energy supplies amid high prices and growing tensions between the West and the Kremlin. The U.S. investigation is also likely to prove uncomfortable for Moscow as it seeks to use its current Group of Eight presidency to champion energy security, and could increase concerns in Western Europe over Gazprom’s efforts to buy energy assets there.
On Wednesday, Gazprom warned European Union diplomats at a meeting in Moscow against thwarting its efforts to expand into Western Europe, saying in a statement that it could sell its gas supplies to China and North America instead of to EU countries, which now get a quarter of their gas from Russia. About 80% of that gas moves through Ukraine.
Doubts about Rosukrenergo’s ownership structure and affiliates prompted its auditors to resign in November, according to a resignation letter from the Vienna office of KPMG International that was obtained by Global Witness, a London-based, left-leaning, privately funded nonprofit organization that promotes the emerging world and investigates corruption, and that was reviewed by The Wall Street Journal. In the letter, KPMG said Rosukrenergo may be part of a larger undisclosed business group, presenting an unacceptable risk to KPMG’s reputation. A KPMG spokesman said he was unable to comment.
Rosukrenergo is at the heart of a bitter political struggle in Ukraine, where President Viktor Yushchenko has come under attack for giving the company the central role in a deal with Gazprom to provide gas to Ukraine in January. Mr. Yushchenko has defended the arrangement as the only way to get an acceptable gas price for Ukraine, but opponents say it invites corruption and opens Ukraine to influence by Gazprom and unidentified businessmen.
In a lengthy forthcoming report, Global Witness provides new details about the origins of Rosukrenergo, and assembles a 15-year history of arbitrage by opaque middleman companies given the lucrative right to sell Central Asian gas to Ukraine via Gazprom’s pipelines. people familiar with the matter corroborated key details of its account.
The report says two other little-known companies with ties to Gazprom received energy deals to convey gas to Ukraine, before Rosukrenergo. One of the firms, Hungarian-registered Eural Trans Gas, has numerous ties to Rosukrenergo, the group said. Among other things, Eural Trans Gas was part-owned by an investment company where a British businessman named Robert Shetler Jones served as a director. Mr. Jones was one of the primary founders of Rosukrenergo. Spokesmen for Eural Trans Gas and Mr. Jones had no comment.
Another Gazprom partner highlighted in the Global Witness report is Itera Group, which played a similar role in selling gas to Ukraine. Itera is a Russian company that has an affiliate in Florida. The company came under investigation by the Federal Bureau of Investigation in 2002, according to an article at the time in Barron’s, which is published by Dow Jones & Co., publisher of the Journal. The probe resulted in no charges, but the previous interest and the affiliate’s presence in the U.S. could give the Justice Department jurisdiction to inquire into Rosukrenergo affairs. An Itera spokesman in Florida didn’t return a call for comment.
Write to Glenn R. Simpson at glenn.simpson@wsj.com and David Crawford at david.crawford@wsj.com

US Investigates Swiss-Registered RosUKrEnergo Gas Company

 

WASHINGTON, DC — The US Justice Department is investigating Swiss-registered RosUKrEnergo, a company of murky ownership that supplies Russian and Central Asian natural gas to Ukraine, a newspaper reported.

RosUKrEnergo Executive Directors Konstantin Chuychenko (L) and Oleg Palchikov. The US Justice Department is investigating Swiss-registered RosUKrEnergo, a company of murky ownership that supplies Russian and Central Asian natural gas to Ukraine

Sources familiar with the inquiry told the Wall Street Journal that representatives of RosUKrEnergo and of Raiffeisen Investment AG, a subsidiary of Vienna-based Raiffeisen Bank AG that holds 50 percent of RosUkrEnergo’s shares for undisclosed owners, met recently with Justice Department officials in Washington.

„They discussed the company’s opaque ownership, though further details of what has drawn the attention of US officials remain unclear,“ the economic daily said.

In a controversial January 4 deal that doubled the price of gas in Ukraine, RosUKrEnergo was designated as the intermediary to provide the country with gas from Russia’s Gazprom and Central Asian suppliers.

Ukranian President Viktor Yushchenko last week said he did not „see a reason to review“ the gas deal, which was a contentious campaign issue during recent parliamentary elections.

The deal raised European Union concerns over Gazprom’s plans to expand its sales. Gazprom this week warned the 25-nation EU not to politicize gas supply issues, threatening to sell fuel elsewhere if its commercial ambitions in the European market were unfairly restricted.

Doubts over RosUKrEnergo’s ownership structure and affiliates prompted its auditors from KMPG International to resign in November, said The Wall Street Journal, citing a resignation letter obtained by the London-based, non-profit organization Global Witness.

„In the letter, KMPG said RosUKrEnergo may be part of a larger undisclosed business group, presenting an unacceptable risk to KPMG’s reputation,“ the Journal said.

The newspaper said that in an upcoming report Global Witness will provide new details about the origins of RosUKrEnergo and its 15-year history of arbitrage by „opaque middleman companies given the lucrative right to sell Central Asian gas to Ukraine via Gazprom’s pipelines.“

Source: AFP

 

Business    

Raiffeisen discloses RosUkrEnergo owners
Journal Staff Report

KIEV, April 26 – Bowing to pressure from the U.S. government, Raiffeisen Investments AG on Wednesday disclosed two owners of RosUkrEnergo, a controversial gas trader, seeking to dispel rumors the company may have links to organized crime.Raiffeisen, which has been managing a 50% stake in RosUkrEnergo since its creation in 2004, confirmed media reports that two Ukrainian businessmen, Dmytro Firtash and Ivan Fursin, actually own the stake.

But the disclosure may trigger new attacks against RosUkrEnergo, in Ukraine and internationally, amid reports suggesting at least one of the businessmen may actually have a link to a controversial figure.

RosUkrEnergo was four months ago named as the only gas supplier to Ukraine for the next five years, but the company had been defying governments by refusing to publicly disclose its real owners.

The U.S. Justice Department’s organized crime division has recently stepped up its efforts to investigate the true ownership of RosUkrEnergo, according to a repot by The Wall Street Journal. RosUkrEnergo and Raiffeisen officials have been recently meeting U.S. investigators in Washington, the newspaper said.

The pressure accelerated amid reports suggesting Semyon Mogilevich, a Ukrainian-born businessman wanted by the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigations for allegedly leading an organized crime group, may have been involved.

Media reports also suggested that powerful Russian politicians may have links to the gas trader after RosUkrEnergo had suddenly won lucrative gas supply contracts from Gazprom, the state-controlled Russian gas giant.

Although the disclosure doesn’t establish any direct link to Mogilevich, Interfax reported that Firtash had been the president of an affiliate of Hungary’s Highrock Holdings Ltd., which is thought to be owned by Mogilevich.

Mogilevich, wanted by the FBI for suspected racketeering, fraud and money laundering, is thought to be living at a luxury dacha near Moscow and is thought to have connections to powerful Russian political figures.

Zeev Gordon, an Israeli lawyer representing Mogilevich, told Reuters on Wednesday that Firtash is acquainted with Mogilevich. But he repeated earlier denials by Mogilevich of any involvement in RosUkrEnergo.

„I spoke to him [Mogilevich] today, and he said: ‚It is not mine and I am not connected to it‘,“ Gordon said.

Raiffeisen vs. Gazprombank

Raiffeisen has been managing a 50% stake in RosUkrEnergo, while Gazprombank, a financial arm of Gazprom, has been managing another 50% stake apparently on behalf of other undisclosed individuals. 

Gazprom recently announced that it would purchase the stake from Gazprombank after a wave of international criticism had been triggered by RosUkrEnergo’s secrecy.

Russian daily newspaper Izvestiya, owned by Gazprom, reported on Wednesday that Firtash and Fursin were the beneficiaries of the stake managed by Raiffeisen. The report cited an audit made by PriceWaterhouseCoopers.

Raiffeisen said Wednesday it would pull out from its involvement with RosUkrEnergo for good within the next two or three months following the disclosure.

Firtash was reported to own 90% of the stake that had been managed by Raiffeisen, while Fursin was reported to own the remaining 10%.

RosUkrEnergo earned $659 million on sales of $3.7 billion in 2005, according to Gazprom. The reported distribution of shares suggests that Firtash earned $296.2 million from its ownership of RosUkrEnergo in 2005, while Fursin earned $33 million.

Firtash, who apparently spends most of his time in Hungary, also owns Kiev basketball club and two Ukrainian television channels, K1 and K2, which have been launched in 2005.

Fursin owns Misto-Bank in Odessa and is also the main shareholder in the Odessa Film Studio.

No plans to revise gas deal

Ukrainian government officials have said that should international investigators prove any corruption links within RosUkrEnergo, Ukraine will try to renegotiate its gas supply agreements.

RosUkrEnergo is to supply gas to Ukraine at $95 per 1,000 cubic meters in the first half of the year, but Gazprom had recently warned the price would probably increase later this year.

Some Ukrainian officials, such as Energy and Fuel Minister Ivan Plachkov, believe the gas price will probably stay unchanged during the next five years. Plachkov said the recently disclosure of ownership will not have any impact on the contract.

„Today, we have no grounds to revise the relations,“ Plachkov told Interfax.

„We have contracts, the price is good, and then we will see,” Plachkov said. “Ukraine will work and consume gas and it would be nice for the price to stay at $95 as agreed.“ (tl/nr/ez)

QUELLE – ARTICLE BY  JUERGEN ROTH 

Top-Mafioso Semion Mogilevich, der Oligarch 

Firtasch und die Raiffeisen-Invest in Wien

Am 13. März 2014 wurde, vollkommen überraschend, der ukrainische Oligarch Firtasch in Wien verhaftet. Dazu einige Hintergrundinformationen. Sie erhellen auch die dubiose Rolle einer Wiener Bank.
Ein kleines ungarisches Dorf, eine noch kleinere Hütte und die Geburt eines Energiegiganten
Die mysteriöse Geschichte um Eural Trans Gas (ETG) begann am 6. Dezember 2002 im Wohnzimmer eines Einfamilienhauses im ungarischen Dörfchen Csapdi. Für umgerechnet 12.000 US-Dollar Grundkapital wurde die Eural Trans Gas (ETG) beim Bezirksgericht Feijer im Handelsregister unter der Nr. 0709009069 eingetragen. Angemeldet hatten das Unternehmen drei rumänische Bürger ohne jegliche Geschäftserfahrung und ein Mittelsmann von Semjon Mogilewitsch. Bei den drei neuen Gesellschaftern handelte es sich um eine Schauspielerin, die hoffte, mit dem Geld ihr Telefon bezahlen zu können; ihren Mann, einen Computerexperten, und um eine Krankenschwester.
Am gleichen Tag, als die neue Firma ETG in das Handelsregister beim Bezirksgericht Feijer eingetragen wurde, unterschrieb einer der Hintermänner von ETG bei Gazprom in Moskau den Gasvertrag zwischen ETG und Gazprom. Damit waren die Rechte für den Gastransport von Zentralasien über Russland in die Ukraine in Höhe von mehreren Milliarden Dollar an ETG vergeben.
Der rumänische Journalist Paul Radu hatte später die drei rumänischen Firmengründer aufgesucht, unter anderem das rumänische Ehepaar. „Es handelte sich um ein junges Ehepaar in einer schwierigen finanziellen Situation. Sie leben in einem einzelnen Zimmer in der Wohnung der Mutter. Kontaktiert wurden sie von einem ungarischen Rechtsanwalt, der ihnen erzählte, dass sie Geld verdienen würden, wenn sie nach Ungarn führen, um sich dort als offizielle Besitzer von ETG eintragen zu lassen.“
Anfragen von Journalisten sowohl bei Gazprom wie Naftogaz, dem ukrainischen Staatsunternehmen, an das die ETG das Gas aus Turkmenistan lieferte, endeten immer gleichlautend. Man wisse nichts über die Kontakte zwischen ETG und Mogilewitsch. Auch die merkwürdigen Besitzverhältnisse änderten daran nichts. Der einzige bemerkenswerte Kommentar kam aus der Kommandozentrale von Gazprom: „Wir verstehen, dass das nicht die transparenteste Firma in der Welt ist. Aber wir haben keine andere Wahl.“ Ein anderes Argument war, dass die Vorläuferfirma von Eural Trans Gas, das Unternehmen Itera, „kein guter Zahler der Transportkosten gewesen sei“.
Von Anfang an stellten sich daher Fragen, die bis heute nicht beantwortet sind. Warum gewährte Gazprom einer winzigen ungarischen Klitsche das Recht, lukrative Exportgeschäfte im Gegenwert von Hunderten von Millionen US-Dollar für die Lieferung von Gas aus Turkmenistan in die Ukraine und weiter nach Europa abzuwickeln?
Und warum genehmigte Gazprom im ersten Halbjahr 2003 dem dubiosen Unternehmen einen Kredit in Höhe von 227 Millionen Euro über die staatliche Außenhandelsbank Wneshekonombank Und warum gewährte die Gazprombank, also eine hundertprozentige Gazprom-Tochter, weitere siebzig Millionen Kredit?
In einem Dossier des österreichischen Bundeskriminalamts wird festgehalten: „Laut Erhebungsergebnis der gemeinsamen Ermittlungsgruppe des FBI und der ungarischen Behörden wurde festgestellt, dass im Jahr 2003 die russische Firma Gazprom ihre Rechte für den Transport von Erdgas an die Eural Trans Gas abgetreten hatte. Diese Gesellschaft war mit Hilfe von Krediten der Gazprom gegründet und aufgebaut worden.“
Auch in Wien lagen der Polizei Erkenntnisse vor, nämlich über die Bankverbindungen der ETG. Sie unterhielt bei der Meinl Bank AG ein Konto, und die Meinl Bank, so das BKA in Wien, hatte bereits seit 2003 mehrfach bei Geschäften mit der ETG mitgewirkt. Und ein Name taucht bereits jetzt auf, der des ukrainischen Oligarchen Dmytro Firtasch. Er soll der wahre Hintermann auch bei ETG gewesen sein.
Der vierte Gesellschafter bei der Firmengründung in der kleinen ungarischen Wohnung war Igor Fisherman, ein langjähriger Geschäftspartner von Mogilewitsch, und zwar über das Unternehmen Highrock Properties Ltd. in Zypern. Die Eintragung in das Zentralregister der Republik Zypern erfolgte am 15. Januar 2001. Gegründet wurde das Unternehmen von Zeev Gordon, einem israelischen Anwalt. Zu dessen besten Klienten gehört Semjon Mogilewitsch bis zum heutigen Tag.
„Ich habe einige Monate lang als Treuhänder für die Aktionäre von ETG gedient“, so Gordon gegenüber der Zeitschrift Profil. „Ich war aber in keiner Art und Weise mit geschäftlichen Aktivitäten betraut.“
Und Semjon Mogilewitsch?
„Er hat mir versichert, dass er mit ETG absolut nichts zu tun hat.“
Laut Interpol war „Igor Fisherman die Kontaktperson zur kriminellen Organisation Solnzevskaja, insbesondere in Verbindung mit Semjon Mogilewitsch, und wurde von den europäischen Polizeibehörden wie dem FBI als Vermittler von Geschäften für die kriminellen Autoritäten gesehen.“
Igor Fisherman war derjenige, der die Aktivitäten von Mogilewitsch in den USA, Ungarn und der Ukraine managte. Deshalb steht er bis zum heutigen Tag auf der Fahndungsliste des FBI. Ein Vorwurf ist Geldwäsche.
Im Zusammenhang mit den undurchsichtigen Besitzverhältnissen der Eural Trans Gas (ETG) hatte sich sogar Carlos Pascual, der damalige US-Botschafter in der Ukraine, öffentlich geäußert. Er sei darüber besorgt, dass russische Banditen Einfluss auf die Gasversorgung nehmen. Als in den Medien darüber berichtet wurde, dass in Wirklichkeit Semjon Mogilewitsch hinter ETG stünde, hagelte es von der ETG angestrengte Verleumdungs- und Schadensersatzklagen, denen damals in Russland meistens stattgegeben wurde. Nein, so die ETG, Semjon Mogilewitsch hat nichts mit dem Unternehmen zu tun. Die öffentliche Diskussion und die politischen Interventionen wegen der unklaren Besitzverhältnisse der ETG waren auf jeden Fall mit ein Motiv, dass sich Gazprom im Jahr 2004 von der ETG trennte.
Die wiedergewonnene Ehre des Semjon Mogilewitsch in Moskau
Der steile Aufstieg in Europa hörte für Semjon Mogilewitsch Ende 1999 auf, als die ungarische Steuerpolizei seine Unterlagen beschlagnahmte. Er setzte sich rechtzeitig nach Moskau ab. Dort galt er weiterhin als angesehener Unternehmer und wechselte nun ins internationale Gasgeschäft. „Es wird behauptet, Semjon Mogilewitsch sei sogar bei russisch-ukrainischen Gasverhandlungen zum Teil persönlich anwesend gewesen“, schreibt das Schweizer Bundesamt für Polizeiwesen über Semjon Mogilewitsch.
Und das, obwohl bereits ein Haftbefehl gegen ihn vorlag, ausgestellt von den US-Justizbehörden. Der Haftbefehl hängt mit einem großen Betrugs- und Geldwäschefall in den USA zusammen. Mogilewitsch spielte dabei die entscheidende Rolle. Stuart Nash, der stellvertretende Generalstaatsanwalt, erklärte am 14. November 2006 vor einem Senatsausschuss: „Semjon Mogilewitsch wird in Pennsylvania wegen Erpressung, Betrug und Geldwäsche im Zusammenhang mit einem Multimillionen-Dollar-Betrugssystem gesucht, bei dem Tausende Investoren in den USA, Kanada und außerhalb geschädigt wurden.“
Am 23. Januar 2008 wurden Semjon Mogilewitsch und sein Partner, der Besitzer der zweitgrößten russischen Parfümeriekette, in Moskau verhaftet. Das Motiv für die vollkommen unerwartete Festnahme, so die darauffolgenden Spekulationen in Moskau, dürfte damit zusammenhängen, dass er ein Milliarden-Dollar-Gasgeschäft zwischen der Ukraine und Russland störte.
Oder seine Festnahme war Ausdruck eines Machtkampfes miteinander konkurrierender Kreml-Klans um das Gasgeschäft. „Die Verhaftung eines Mannes von dieser Größe“, sagte Wladimir Owschinski, der ehemalige russische Interpol-Direktor und Kreml-Berater, „ist ein Kampf an der Spitze.“ Deshalb wurde Semjon Mogilewitsch auch nicht wegen des Haftbefehls des FBI verhaftet, sondern wegen Steuerhinterziehung. Während der Ermittlungen gegen Mogilewitsch trat der Chefermittler zurück. Der Stab des russischen Präsidenten hatte ihn aufgefordert zu erklären, dass das auf eigenen Wunsch geschehe. Auch sein Nachfolger wurde nach nur kurzer Zeit abgelöst. Im Gegensatz zu Al Capone, der mit der gleichen Begründung verhaftet und später verurteilt wurde, kam Mogilewitsch achtzehn Monate später wieder frei.
Die Vorwürfe seien nicht substantiiert gewesen, begründete das Gericht seine Entlassung aus dem Gefängnis. Fast gleichlautend argumentierte eine Sprecherin des Innenministeriums. „Die Vorwürfe sind nicht besonders gravierend, daher haben die Ermittler kein besonderes Interesse mehr, ihn weiter im Gefängnis zu halten.“
Das FBI sieht das immer noch ganz anders. Auf der FBI-Webseite ist er wegen Erpressung, Betrug und Geldwäsche international zur Fahndung ausgeschrieben. Im Oktober 2009 hatte das FBI einen neuen internationalen Haftbefehl ausstellen lassen. Seitdem gehört er zu den zehn Meistgesuchten (most wanted) vom FBI. Das FBI hat 100.000 US-Dollar als Belohnung für jegliche Informationen ausgelobt, die zu Mogilewitschs Verhaftung führen.
Das FBI begründet den Haftbefehl folgendermaßen: „Ein ukrainischer Geschäftsmann wird der Erpressung beschuldigt, des Betruges, Geldwäsche und weiterer Wirtschaftskriminalität in mehr als vierzig Fällen in Dutzenden von Ländern in der Welt. Er wurde neu in die Liste der zehn Meistgesuchten aufgenommen.“ Das FBI habe jedoch keine gesetzlichen Möglichkeiten, ihn wegen anderer krimineller Aktivitäten zu verfolgen, so Special Agent Peter Kowenhoven, „aber offene Quellen zeigen, dass er in den Waffenhandel, Auftragsmorde, Erpressung, Drogenhandel und Prostitution auf internationaler Ebene tätig war“.
Peter Kowenhoven bezeichnet ihn – immerhin auf der offiziellen FBI-Webseite – als einen skrupellosen Kriminellen. Opfer bedeuten ihm nichts. Und was ihn so gefährlich mache, sei, dass er grenzenlos agiere. „Durch sein extensives internationales kriminelles Netzwerk kontrolliert Mogilewitsch Naturgaspipelines in Osteuropa, und er benutzt seinen Reichtum und seine Macht nicht nur für seine kriminellen Unternehmen, sondern auch, um Regierungen und deren Wirtschaft zu beeinflussen.“
Neben der strafrechtlichen Würdigung eines einzelnen Topgangsters zeigen die hier deutlich gewordenen undurchschaubaren Geflechte zwischen ihm und Firmen, die auf die eine oder andere Art und Weise miteinander verbunden sind, noch etwas anderes, eine viel größere Bedrohung: die Übernahme der Energieversorgung durch Banditen.
Kurzum: Hinter der Fassade von Eural Trans Gaz (ETG) versteckten sich zwei bekannte Männer. Der eine, Semjon Mogilewitsch, war ein Topkrimineller. Der andere, der ukrainische Oligarch Dmytro Firtasch, der anscheinend ohne Mogilewitsch im Gasgeschäft keine Fortune gehabt hätte. Und der Gazprom-Vorstand in Moskau wusste das natürlich und hatte keine Skrupel, mit solchen Personen Milliardengeschäfte abzuschließenDoch was ist nun mit den Gaslieferungen aus Turkmenistan in die Ukraine? Und hatte sich Gazprom, wie erwartet wurde, jetzt selbst um die Lieferungen aus Turkmenistan gekümmert, ohne einen umstrittenen Zwischenhändler wie ETG einzuschalten?
Das Katz-und-Maus-Spiel um die wahren Eigentümer
Nein, jetzt ging man noch gewiefter vor, indem eine neue Gesellschaft gegründet wurde, die Russisch-Ukrainische Energie RosUkrEnergo, kurz RUE. RUE war im Prinzip eine Schöpfung des ukrainischen Präsidenten Leonid Kutschma und seines russischen Kollegen Wladimir Putin. Die Entscheidung wurde offiziell am 26. Juli 2004 während eines ukrainisch-russischen Business Forums in Jalta von den beiden Präsidenten bekanntgegeben. Doch das Unternehmen – mit dem Geschäftszweck, Handel mit Rohstoffen im Energiesektor, insbesondere mit Gas zu betreiben – wurde bereits einige Tage zuvor in Zug registriert, am 22. Juli 2004.
Waren bei der ETG die wahren Besitzverhältnisse schon bizarr genug, sollte sich das noch steigern lassen. Bei RosUkrEnergo handelt es sich zwar wieder um ein eher kleines Unternehmen, das über großes Kapitalvermögen verfügte. Aber es wurde diesmal nicht in einem kleinen ungarischen Dorf gegründet, sondern im noblen Schweizer Steuerparadies Zug. Am 22. Juli 2004 meldete der Schweizer Treuhänder Lars Haussmann, der damalige Juniorchef der Zürcher Finanzberatungsfirma Haussmann und Partner, die RosUkrEnergo AG (RUE) an.
Die Finanzberatungsfirma Haussmann verwaltete zusätzlich das am 14. Februar 2005 in Zug registrierte Unternehmen Cronos Im-Ex AG. Das gibt als Geschäftszweck den Handel mit chemischen Produkten sowie mit Gütern und Maschinen für den Bedarf der chemischen Industrie an. Die Cronos Im-Ex AG wiederum ist ein Unternehmen, das im Zusammenhang mit Semjon Mogilewitsch erwähnt wurde. Und das kommt so: Direktor von Cronos Im-Ex AG in Zug ist Alexander Emelin aus Moskau. Er war der Repräsentant von Dmytro Firtaschs Import- und Export-Unternehmen Euronit in Moskau und nach 2002 in Moskau Angestellter der Handelsgesellschaft Elmstad Trading in Zypern. Hier arbeitete er mit Oleg Palschikow zusammen, dem Direktor von RosUkrEnergo.
Die Verbindung zu Semjon Mogilewitsch stellte der Moskauer Journalist Roman Shleynow her, als er in dem Unternehmensregister darauf stieß, dass das Büro des Repräsentanten von Euronit unter der gleichen Adresse eingetragen war wie diejenige Firma, in der Olga Schneider, eine von Mogilewitschs insgesamt drei Exfrauen, als Eigentümerin verzeichnet ist. Unter der gleichen Telefonnummer wie Euronit fand sich das wenig bekannte Handelsunternehmen Transkomplekt. Und das wiederum gehört Galina Telesch, Mogilewitschs zweiter Exehefrau und damaliger Gattin von Igor Fisherman.
Eigentümer der RosUkrEnergo (RUE) waren zu je fünfzig Prozent zwei in Wien registrierte Holdings: Agrogas und Centragas. Sie wurden 2004 von der Raiffeisen Investment AG gegründet, einem Ableger der österreichischen Raiffeisenbank. Wer sich hinter Agrogas verbarg, war schnell klar: Gazprom. Aber wer war der Eigentümer von Centragas? Das sollte lange ein streng gehütetes Geheimnis bleiben, obwohl erste Vermutungen aufkamen, als der Name eines der Geschäftsführer von RosUkrEnergo bekannt wurde: Oleg Palschikow. Er war zuvor Moskau-Repräsentant der ungarischen Eural Trans Gas, also verbunden mit Semjon Mogilewitsch. Der andere, von Gazprom eingesetzte Geschäftsführer arbeitete von 1989 bis 1992 für den KGB und war später Leiter der Gazprom-Rechtsabteilung und Mitglied des Gazprom-Vorstands.
Schaut man sich nun einmal die Webseite von RosUkrEnergo an, dann ist für ein milliardenschweres Unternehmen wenig, eigentlich überhaupt nichts zu erfahren, abgesehen davon, dass ihre Shareholders Gazprom und die Centragas Holding sind. Herauszufinden, wer die Aktionäre der Centragas Holding waren, sollte mit allerlei Tricks verhindert werden. Es war der mächtige Oligarch Dmytro Firtasch mit vierzig Prozent, ein zumindest zeitweise enger Bekannter von Semjon Mogilewitsch. Der andere Aktienbesitzer mit fünf Prozent Anteil war ein Ivan Fursin, ebenfalls ein ukrainischer Unternehmer.
Auch die österreichische Polizei hatte darüber Erkenntnisse. Das Wiener BKA schrieb über ein Treffen im April 2005 in Wien. „Bereits im April 2005 konnte durch hiesige Erhebungen festgestellt werden, dass Fursin und Palschikow in Wien mit Dmytro Firtasch zusammentrafen. Ermittlungen des FBI ergaben, dass diese unmittelbar darauf ein gemeinsames Treffen mit der Raiffeisen Bank hatten.“
Zweck des Treffens, meinten die Ermittler, sei die Einrichtung von Bankkonten gewesen. Eines dieser Konten (70.54.024.500/01) wurde im Mai und Juni 2005 benutzt, um Gelder der RUE an Gazprom und die ukrainische Firma Naftogaz zu überweisen. Mitte 2005 gab es eine weitere Überweisung. Diesmal von dem Raiffeisen-Bankkonto (70.50966.712) auf verschiedene Konten von Firmen in Estland, Russland und Großbritannien. Inhaber dieses Bankkontos? Eine Firma von Dmytro Firtasch.
Damals musste bei der Firmengründung alles sehr schnell gehen. Deshalb firmierte die Raiffeisen Investment AG (RIAG) in Wien und eine ihrer Sekretärinnen als Vertreter von Centragas. Die RIAG gilt als der aggressivste Player bei Privatisierungen und Übernahmen in Zentral- und Osteuropa, und es gibt kein osteuropäisches Land, in dem sie nicht prominent vertreten ist. In bestimmten Geschäftsbereichen scheint sie besondere Qualitäten zu entwickeln. „Über lokale Schmiergeldgepflogenheiten berichtete der RIAG-Vorstand Wolfgang Putschek laut Salzburger Nachrichten: ‚Das läuft in der ganzen Welt gleich. Im Westen vielleicht etwas eleganter.‘“
Er muss es wissen, leitete er doch zuvor die Raiffeisen Investment in Budapest. Am gleichen Tag, am 22. Juli 2004, als RUE im schweizerischen Steuerparadies Zug registriert wurde, wurde im ebenfalls als Steueroase bekannten Österreich von der Raiffeisen Investment die Centragas Holding AG in Wien angemeldet. Verwaltet wurde die RUE von einem Koordinierungskomitee, das aus acht Mitgliedern bestand. Vier von der Gazprombank und vier von Raiffeisen Investment. Mitglieder des Komitees auf der Seite von Centragas waren unter anderem Wolfgang Putschek und Juri Boiko, der damalige Generaldirektor der staatlichen Naftogaz Ukraine. Zu den vier Mitgliedern der Gazprombank gehörten Alexander Medwedew von Gazprom Export, Alexander Ryazanow, stellvertretender Vorsitzender des Managementkomitees von Gazprom, sein Stellvertreter, Juri Komarow, und der Chef der Gazprombank, Andrej Akimow.
Interfax zitierte den damaligen ukrainischen Ministerpräsidenten Juri Jechanurow (2005–2006), der zu dem Thema, dass RosUkrEnergo doch wegen krimineller Aktivitäten Bestandteil von Ermittlungen sei, Folgendes antwortete: „Die Ukraine hatte keine Verbindung zu RUE. Es ist eine Firma, die von Gazprom gegründet wurde.“ Während des Interviews sagte er außerdem: „Es ist nicht so, dass wir uns dessen nicht bewusst sind, was die RUE ist. Wir haben aber keine Alternative. Die russische Seite bot eine Firma an. Weder unser Sicherheitsdienst noch unsere wirtschaftlichen Partner haben irgendeinen offiziellen Beweis wegen fehlender Transparenz bei den Geschäften dieser Firma.“
Gemeint war nicht nur Semjon Mogilewitsch, sondern auch Dmytro Firtasch, der mächtige ukrainische Oligarch.
Die Rolle der Raiffeisen Investment im Zusammenhang mit der RosUkrEnergo blieb lange Zeit im Nebel des Bankgeheimnisses versteckt. Wolfgang Putschek, der bei Raiffeisen Investment die Aktien der Centragas verwaltete, behauptete zunächst, dass sein Unternehmen überhaupt nichts mit der RUE zu tun habe und nur dessen Anlageportfolio verwalte. Das würde ukrainischen Geschäftsleuten gehören, die in der Gaswirtschaft tätig sind. Er weigerte sich, diese Investoren konkret zu nennen. In einer Pressemitteilung vom 4. Januar 2006 erklärte er wiederum, dass sein Unternehmen sicherstellen soll, dass RUE im Einklang mit den westeuropäischen Standards arbeite und Raiffeisen Investment lediglich die finanziellen Angelegenheiten überwache.
Dafür hat er immerhin viel Geld kassiert, glaubt man einer Depesche von US-Diplomaten, die am 1. Dezember 2010 durch Wikileaks öffentlich wurde. „RosUkrEnergo zahlte jährlich je 360.000 Dollar an jeden der zwei Raiffeisen-Investment-Verantwortlichen als Beratungsgebühr. Wir vermuten, dass es wahrscheinlich Schmiergeld für die RIAG ist, um Mogilewitsch außen vor zu halten.“ So weit diese Behauptung der US-Diplomaten, die von den Beteiligten später dementiert wurde.
Warum sollte die Gazprombank, ein mächtiges Kreditinstitut, zur Überwachung der „finanziellen Angelegenheiten“ eine Investmentgesellschaft in Wien benötigen? Ist es vorstellbar, dass die Gazprombank ihren eigenen Steuerberatern misstraut und deshalb ein Unternehmen gründet, um die Transparenz zu gewährleisten?
„Wir haben unsere Auftraggeber einer strikten Überprüfung unterzogen“, erklärte Wolfgang Putschek gegenüber Journalisten des österreichischen Wochenmagazins Profil als Begründung. „Ich sehe da wenig Raum für Irrtümer.“ Raiffeisen Investment sei in dieser Transaktion nur finanz- und rechtstechnischer Abwickler: „Wir führen bloß die Aufträge unserer Treugeber aus – selbstverständlich auf legaler Basis. Sollten wir irgendwelche Bedenken haben, etwa dass es kriminelle Verbindungen geben könnte, würden wir uns sofort zurückziehen. Das ist auch vertraglich vereinbart.“ Außerdem hätten doch die Compliance-Abteilung der Raiffeisen und die US-Sicherheitsfirma Kroll die Treugeber genau überprüft und nichts Bedenkliches bei den ukrainischen Geschäftsleuten gefunden, und die hätten dann grünes Licht gegeben. Das war dann anscheinend eine besondere Prüfungsmethode.
Zumindest bei Gazprom war das sowieso lädierte Image bedroht, weil so viele internationale Polizeibehörden, insbesondere das FBI, sich mit dem Unternehmen beschäftigten. Am 16. Januar 2007 kaufte Gazprom daher die Gazprombank-Anteile an der RUE auf und setzte neue Manager ein. Unter anderem Valeri Golubew, einen ehemaligen KGB-Offizier, der 2006 stellvertretender Vorsitzender des Gazprom-Verwaltungsrats wurde. Trotzdem blieben die ukrainischen Aktionäre von Centragas weiter geheim. Erst auf großen internationalen Druck hin legte die Raiffeisen Investment im Juni 2006 die bislang geheimen Treugeber (Dmytro Firtasch und Ivan Fursin) offen – und beendete die so lange geheimgehaltenen Beziehungen.
Ob es danach weitere Geschäftsbeziehungen zu Firtasch gegeben hat, ließ Putschek offen. „Wir sehen keinen Grund, einen Kunden wie Herrn Firtasch abzulehnen“, wird er vor einem Untersuchungsausschuss in Wien zitiert. Aber – wir ahnen es – Kundenbeziehungen unterliegen generell dem Bankgeheimnis. Und das österreichische Bankgeheimnis ist bekanntlich besonders ausgeprägt, wenn es um Kunden aus der ehemaligen UdSSR geht.
Wie ging es mit RosUkrEnergo weiter
Die international angesehene Nichtregierungsorganisation Global Witness in London hat sich als erste Organisation überhaupt das Ziel gesetzt, die Verflechtungen zwischen der Nutzung natürlicher Ressourcen einerseits und Konflikten und Korruption andererseits aufzubrechen.
Am 8. Januar 2009 schrieb Global Witness einen offenen Brief an Alexei Miller, den Vorstandsvorsitzenden von Gazprom. „Wie Sie natürlich wissen, kauft RosUkrEnergo Gas von Gazprom, um es in die Ukraine und andere Ländern zu verkaufen. Fünfzig Prozent gehören Gazprom. Es ist nun öffentlich geworden, dass der Rest der Anteile zwei ukrainischen Geschäftleuten gehört, Dmytro Firtasch (45 Prozent) und Ivan Fursin (fünf Prozent). Wir versuchen seit vier Jahren zu verstehen, warum eine solche Zwischenfirma notwendig ist.“
Global Witness bezog sich auf eine Zusage vom Februar 2008, als der damalige Präsident Wladimir Putin und der ukrainische Präsident Viktor Juschtschenko eine Vereinbarung getroffen hatten, wonach RosUkrEnergo durch ein Joint Venture abgelöst werden sollte, und zwar direkt zwischen Gazprom und dem ukrainischen staatlichen Energiemonopol Naftogaz Ukraine. Doch entgegen diesen Verlautbarungen hatte sich nichts getan.
Die Installation von RosUkrEnergo (RUE) im Sommer 2004 war trotz alledem ein gutes Geschäft. 2006 berichtete die Gazprombank, dass Gazprom von RosUkrEnergo eine Dividende von 367,8 Millionen Dollar erhalten habe. Das heißt aber auch, dass Dmytro Firtasch und Ivan Fursin eine Dividende in gleicher Höhe gutgeschrieben bekamen, die ansonsten bei Gazprom die Aktionäre gefreut hätte. Bis 2009 zahlte RUE an Gazprom über zwei Milliarden Dollar an Dividenden – das Tausendfache des Kaufpreises. 2010 war in ukrainischen Medien zu lesen, dass an Gazprom für das Jahr 2010 eine Dividende von insgesamt 550 Millionen von RUE überwiesen wurde.
Dann jedoch wurde RUE auf Anordnung der ukrainischen Ministerpräsidentin Julia Timoschenko im Jahr 2010 erst einmal aus dem lukrativen Gasgeschäft gedrängt – mit unabsehbaren Folgen für die politische Kultur in der Ukraine. „Korrumpierte und skrupellose Schattenfirma”, nannte sie RUE und erzwang direkte Gaslieferungen von Russland in die Ukraine ohne den Umweg über einen ominösen Mittelsmann.
Der staatliche ukrainische Gaskonzern Naftogaz beschlagnahmte deshalb kurzerhand 12,1 Milliarden Kubikmeter Gasreserven von RUE. In einer Nacht-und-Nebel-Aktion hatte Gazprom seine Forderungen gegenüber der RUE (1,7 Milliarden US-Dollar) an Naftogaz abgetreten und so die Gasbeschlagnahmung ermöglicht. Der Konflikt über diese Aktion hält bis heute an. Denn RosUkrEnergo (RUE) klagte gegen diesen Beschluss der Regierung. Vor dem Stockholmer Schiedsgericht wurde im Sommer 2010 Naftogaz dazu verpflichtet, die 12,1 Milliarden Kubikmeter Erdgas an RUE zurückzugeben. Bei der Bewertung gingen die Auffassungen beider Seiten vor dem Schiedsgericht weit auseinander. RUE hatte erklärt, dass Naftogaz 5,4 Milliarden US-Dollar zahlen solle, während die ukrainische Seite diesen Wert im Moment der Beschlagnahmung mit 1,6 Milliarden US-Dollar bewertet hatte. Der aktuelle Preis lag bei der Entscheidung des Stockholmer Schiedsgerichts bei 2,78 Milliarden US-Dollar.
Im August 2010 bestätigte ein Gericht in Kiew die Entscheidung des Schiedsgerichts und verpflichtete Naftogaz, an RosUkrEnergo 12,1 Milliarden Kubikmeter Gas bis zum 1. September 2010 oder innerhalb einer von beiden Seiten abgestimmten Frist zu erstatten. Das wären umgerechnet drei Milliarden US-Dollar. Ein anderes Urteil wäre in Kiew auch nicht zu erwarten gewesen. Jetzt herrschte Viktor Janukowitsch, der die bislang sowieso nicht besonders unabhängige Justiz endgültig gefesselt hatte. Auf jeden Fall können sowohl Gazprom wie Dmytro Firtasch seitdem weiter ihre Geschäfte in Europa betreiben.
Veröffentlicht: March 13th, 2014 · Autor:  
.
by http://rbentlarvt.blogspot.com/2011/05/semion-mogilevich-chose-raiffeisen-bank.html

Semion Mogilevich Money Laundering at Raiffeisen Bank Austria / Robert Friedman : „The Most Dangerous Mobster in the World“ / Wikileaks on Red Mafia

 

Semion Mogilevich is an international businessman with interests in“arms dealing, drug running, uranium trafficking and multiple murders“. (Nico Hines, Semyon Mogilevich, the ‚East European mafia boss‘, captured in Moscow, The Sunday Times, 25 Jan 2008)  Raiffeisen has experience in laundering ‚Ndrangheta Mafia drug profits.IMPLICATED IN MAJOR FRAUD IN AMERICA

Semion Mogilevich is wanted for his alleged participation in a multi-million dollar

 

scheme to defraud thousands of investors in the stock of a public company incorporated in Canada, but headquartered in Newtown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, between 1993 and 1998. The scheme to defraud collapsed in 1998, afterthousands of investors lost in excess of 150 million U.S. dollars, and Mogilevich, thought to have allegedly funded and authorized the scheme, was indicted in April of 2003. „http://www.fbi.gov/wanted/topten/semion-mogilevichMONEY LAUNDERING

His many criminal enterprises generate a lot of cash, which often needs to be laundered.

The Brainy Don looked around for a bank that had something in common with him. He discovered Raiffeisen.RAIFFEISEN SNUGGLY CLOSE WITH ITS CUSTOMERS

According to longtime Raiffeisen boss Dietmar Heingärtner, this bank is well known for how close it is to its customers. (Dietmar Heingärtner, reference)

Customers like „The enigmatic leader of the Red Mafia is a 52-year-old Ukrainian-born Jew named Semion Mogilevich.“ (Robert Friedman, The Most Dangerous Mobster in the World – According to the FBI and Israeli Intelligence, Semion Mogilevich Rules Over an Arms-Trafficking, Money-Laundering, Drug-Running, and Art-Smuggling ‚Red Mafia‘, The Village Voice, 26 May 1998)

SHARED PHILOSOPHY OF BUSINESS ETHICS

How could a reputable bank possibly be close to a major mobster?A reputable bank couldn’t do it:

Just like Mr.Mogilevich,Raiffeisen has been involved in a „multi-million dollar scheme to defraud investors“.

мафия

„U.S.-indicted crime boss Semyon Mogilevich probably uses RZB and its subsidiary Raiffeisen Investment Holding AG Algeria (RIAG)

A FRONT FOR ORGANIZED CRIME

as a front to provide legitimacy to the gas company that we suspect he controls, RosUkrEnergo (RUE). RUE makes

DIRTY MONEY

direct payments of $360,000 annually to each of two RIAG executives in „consulting fees.“ We assess that the payments probably are bribes for RIAG to maintain the front for Mogilevich (ref D).“ (American Embassy Vienna Austria, Secret Cable, 15 Feb 2006 published at Wikileaks,http://www.wikileaks.ch/cable/2006/02/06VIENNA515.html)According to Raiffeisen boss Heingärtner, 

his bank knows its customers „very well“.(Dietmar Heingärtner,reference) And he speaks truth.They’re in the same business.

 

‚Ndrangheta Mafia Money Laundering Scandal at Raiffeisen Bank Austria / A Culture of Illegality

 
„Dmitry AnatolyevichMedvedev is the third and currentPresident of the Russian Federation.“ (Dmitry Medvedev, Wikipedia)
In his job, he has access to intelligence reports from one of the world’s major services, the FSB.
So of course he’s heard the „stories about mafia involvement“ with Raiffeisen. (Dmitry Medvedev cited in Shaun Walker, Perhaps Out of Place, But Still in the Money, Russia Profile, 27 Apr 2006)
A SHADOWY ORGANIZATION
But “If there are people behind Raiffeisen that you don’t know about, neither do we.“ „We have no idea who is behind Raiffeisen.“ (Dmitry Medvedev cited in Shaun Walker, Perhaps Out of Place, But Still in the Money, Russia Profile, 27 Apr 2006)
INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALIST GOES BEHIND THE FASSADE
Now Raiffeisen markets a pretty fassade (see at left). They politely
 
explain that there is „Eine Stadt. Eine Bank.“ One city, one bank.
Of course, this is not true.
There are many cities, and many banks around the world.
But for a certain clientele, there is indeed „Eine Stadt“ and nur „Eine Bank“ — for money laundering.
RENOWNED EXPERT ON ORGANIZED CRIME
„Jürgen Roth (* 1945 in Frankfurt am Main) ist ein deutscher Publizist, der Bücher und Fernsehdokumentationen über die organisierte Kriminalität mit Schwerpunkt Osteuropa, Deutschland und den internationalen Terrorismus veröffentlicht hat. Er ist zudem aktiv in der Organisation Business Crime Control.“ (Jürgen Roth, Wikipedia)
ORGANIZED CRIME AN INTEGRAL COMPONENT OF THE EUROPEAN BUSINESS WORLD
Herr Roth has discovered that „dieOrganisierte Kriminalität sei mit dem Wirtschaftssystem tief verflochten. Die organisierte Kriminalität sei in Europa“ „ein Bestandteil des Wirtschaftslebens.“ (Jürgen Roth, Wikipedia)
NDRANGHETA MAFIA BANKS AT RAIFFEISEN
Herr Roth proves that Raiffeisen was the point of integration between the „Geschäften der Mafia“ (documented here) and the economic life of Europe.
The Mafia side was represented by „Carlo „das Stinktier“ Focarelli, Manlio Denaro und Ricardo Scoponi“. The Raiffeisen account number was 154052493. (Jürgen Roth, Es war vorauszusehen, dass es Verbindungen zwischen Mario L. aus Stuttgart und demNdrangheta-Boss Franco Pugliese gibt. Franco Pugliese gibt das selbst zu.,http://www.mafialand.de/Members/roth/noch-immer-liest-man-in-deutschland-wenig-ueber-den-gewaltigen-geldwaescheskandal-in-italien-und-die-rolle-der-ndrangheta.-dabei-spielt-ein-hoher-politiker-aus-stuttgart-anscheinend-eine-rolle.-doch-das-lka-in-stuttgart-scheint-zu-schlafen)
JUST HOW CLOSE IS THE RELATIONSHIP?
So, are we talking about an arm’s length relationship, or something much more intimate?
„RAIFFEISEN IS KNOWN FOR BEING CLOSE TO ITS CUSTOMERS AND KNOWING THEM WELL“
„Die Raiffeisenbank zeichnet sich durch ihre Kundennähe und Kundenkenntnis aus.“ (Dietmar Heingärtner cited in Interview von Dr. Mag. Dietmar Heingärtner, http://www.club-carriere.com/phpscripts/inserat.php?name=Dietmar%20Heing%E4rtner&K_ID=100339)
How reliable is our source?
„Seit 1977 arbeite ich für die Raiffeisenbank. Im Jahre 1979 besuchte ich die Fachkurse I und II an der Raiffeisenakademie in Wien. 1982 erhielt ich die Prokura. 1987 wurde ich zum Geschäftsleiter ernannt.“ (Dietmar Heingärtner cited in Interview von Dr. Mag. Dietmar Heingärtner, http://www.club-carriere.com/phpscripts/inserat.php?
name=Dietmar%20Heing%E4rtner&K_ID=100339) This man has been working at Raiffeisen for more than 30 years, and has been running the business since 1987.
Accordingly, Raiffeisen knew exactly who it was dealing with when it became involved with the
korrupten italienischen Senator Di Girolamo und seinen Hilfstruppen der Ndrangheta“.(Jürgen Roth, Es war vorauszusehen, dass es Verbindungen zwischen Mario L. aus Stuttgart und dem Ndrangheta-Boss Franco Pugliese gibt. Franco Pugliese gibt das selbst zu.,http://www.mafialand.de/Members/roth/noch-immer-liest-man-in-deutschland-wenig-ueber-den-gewaltigen-geldwaescheskandal-in-italien-und-die-rolle-der-ndrangheta.-dabei-spielt-ein-hoher-politiker-aus-stuttgart-anscheinend-eine-rolle.-doch-das-lka-in-stuttgart-scheint-zu-schlafen)
DAMNING ADMISSIONS
„In the past decade, the ‚Ndrangheta has emerged as a powerful and aggressive organisation, becoming one of the world’s biggest cocaine traffickers.“ (Dozens of ‚Ndrangheta members arrested in Italy and Germany, The Guardian, 8 Mar 2011) 
„Unsere Kunden sind Mitglieder der Bank“. (Dietmar Heingärtner cited in Interview von Dr. Mag. Dietmar Heingärtner,http://www.club-carriere.com/phpscripts/inserat.php?name=Dietmar%20Heing%E4rtner&K_ID=100339) Raiffeisen boss Heingärtner explains that his „customers are members of the bank.“Customers which just happen to include the Ndrangheta Mafia.So, according to the Raiffeisen boss, members of his bank (per Dietmar Heingärtner cited in Interview von Dr. Mag. Dietmar Heingärtner,http://www.club-carriere.com/phpscripts/inserat.php?name=Dietmar%20Heing%E4rtner&K_ID=100339) are trafficking cocaine. (per Dozens of ‚Ndrangheta members arrested in Italy and Germany, The Guardian, 8 Mar 2011) Obviously, this place is so much more than a mere money laundry.
„The principal allegations stem from a Spanish prosecutor, José Grinda González, who has spent more than a decade trying to unravel the activities of Russian organised crime in Spain. Spanish authorities have arrested more than 60 suspects, including the top four mafia bosses outside Russia.“ (Dozens of ‚Ndrangheta members arrested in Italy and Germany, The Guardian, 8 Mar 2011)
According to the Russian government: „We have no idea who is behind Raiffeisen.“(Dmitry Medvedev cited in Shaun Walker, Perhaps Out of Place, But Still in the Money, Russia Profile, 27 Apr 2006)
Sure.
„KLEPTOCRACIES“
According to the United States Government, „Russia is a corrupt, autocratic kleptocracy centred on the leadership of Vladimir Putin, in which officials, oligarchs and organised crime are bound together to create a „virtual mafia state“, according to leaked secret diplomatic cables that provide a damning American assessment of its erstwhile rival superpower.“ (Luke Harding, WikiLeaks cables condemn Russia as ‚mafia state‘, The Guardian, 1 Dec 2010)
Just in Russia?
Dr. Heingärtner makes his public appearances to the tunes of Pirates of the Caribbean.
Will Turner: You didn’t beat me.You ignored the rules of engagement. In a fair fight, I’d kill you.
Jack Sparrow: That’s not much incentive for me to fight fair, then, is it?“
(Memorable quotes for Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003), The Internet Movie Database)
And so we see yet again „Die organisierte Kriminalität sei in Europa“ „ein Bestandteil des Wirtschaftslebens.“ (Jürgen Roth, Wikipedia) Quelle by rbentlarvt

UND HERBERT STEPIC „kennt Mogilevich NATUERLICH NICHT“

RZB-Vorstand Stepic kündigt „Outing“ wahrer Eigentümer an – Behörden hätten Namen stets gekannt
Wien (SN-wie). Die Raiffeisen Investment AG (RIAG), eine Tochter der Raiffeisen Zentralbank (RZB), wird sich aus dem Gashandelsunternehmen Rosukrenergo zurückziehen. Das kündigte der stellvertretende RZB-Chef Herbert Stepic am Montag an. RIAG hält seit 2004 die Hälfte der Anteile an dem russisch-ukrainischen Gemeinschaftsunternehmen, dessen russischer Partner die Gazprom ist. Über die Identität der ukrainischen Aktionäre gab es nur Spekulationen, zuletzt interessierten sich US-Behörden dafür.
Stepic sagte, dass die Eigentümer, deren Anteile RIAG treuhändisch halte, demnächst an die Öffentlichkeit gehen würden. Die russischen und ukrainischen Behörden hätten immer gewusst, wer die wahren Eigentümer seien. Auch die österreichische Finanzmarktaufsicht sei von Raiffeisen auf Anfrage zu Jahresbeginn über die wahre Identität der Treugeber informiert worden.
Stepic verwahrte sich dagegen, dass sich Raiffeisen durch den Treuhandvertrag in die Nähe von organisierter Kriminalität begeben habe. Man habe die Eigner vor Eingehen der Beteiligung von Kroll Associates, einem renommierten US-amerikanischen Risikomanagementunternehmen, überprüfen lassen. Dabei habe es keine Hinweise auf kriminelle Hintergründe gegeben. Mit Rosukrenergo wird der vom FBI gesuchte Unternehmer Semion Mogilevich in Verbindung gebracht. Er kenne Mogilevich „natürlich nicht“, sagte Stepic.
Warum es nun zum „Outing“ der Aktionäre kommen werde, begründete er damit, dass der im Jänner geschlossene Kompromiss über Gaslieferungen von Russland in die Ukraine im Sommer auslaufe. Es sei immer geplant gewesen, den Vertrag nach Feststehen der neuen ukrainischen Regierung neu zu verhandeln. Ziel sei eine langfristige Vereinbarung. Dann gebe es neue Spielregeln, nicht vorstellbar sei, dass die RIAG ihre Beteiligung dann noch aufrecht erhalten werde.
Ob Rosukrenergo, die börsefähig gemacht werden soll, tatsächlich an die Börse gehen werde, sei ebenso offen wie der allfällige Zeitpunkt.Quelle search.salzburg.com


WEITER AUF UNSEREM BLOG UNTER DEM LOGO
WER WIRD ES WOHL ENDLICH SCHAFFEN,
DIE GIEBELKREUZKRAKE
UND IHRE VERFLECHTUNGEN, AUFZUDECKEN?
——————————————————————————————————————————————
Aus dieser Quelle zur weiteren Verbreitung entnommen:
http://bankenindieschranken.blogspot.co.at/2015/02/what-you-want-find-in-austrian-media.html

What you want find in Austrian Media – Swiss Franc Hurts Homeowners but Could Be a Boon for Investors

By Resource SpecialistMoney Morning
 
 
When the Swiss National Bank de-pegged from the euro last month, the fallout was massive.
One dramatic example of its impact was that felt by Miami-based hedge fund manager Everest Capital. The firm’s largest single fund lost nearly all its capital, $830 million in assets, thanks to heavy bets that the Swiss francwould decline.
Alpari UK, a foreign exchange broker, became insolvent. New York’s FXCM Inc. (NYSE: FXCM), an online foreign exchange trading firm, got a $300 million lifeline from Leucadia National Corp. (NYSE: LUK).
But just like the subprime mortgage debacle in the United States, small retail investors are caught in the crosshairs too.
Don’t let yourself be one.

How Europe Could Stem the Incoming Tide of Bad Loans

Few may be aware that in the 2000s, homeowners in Eastern Europe – mainly Poland, Romania, and Hungary – took out Swiss franc-denominated mortgages.
Despite warnings from policymakers and economists, these mortgages were irresistible thanks to interest rates far below those of their national currencies.
But what borrowers failed to understand (or chose to overlook) was the exchange rate risk embedded in those loans. Thanks to the recent surge in the franc against the euro and numerous other currencies, the burden of those mortgage payments has been compounded by the exchange-rate variable.
Now those mortgage holders are clamoring for help, and getting it in the most likely of places. Even better, there are companies that can profit handsomely from the situation.
Back in November, Hungary made a deal with retail banks to convert forex home mortgages into the local currency at official exchange rates. It’s a compromise deal, where homeowners gain a lot, and banks lose a bit. Sort of.
1.3 million households saw a 25% to 30% drop in their monthly payments. For their efforts, retail banks will get a 9 billion euro bailout from the central bank’s foreign currency reserves.
Needless to say, this move was hugely popular with concerned borrowers, and earned Prime Minister Orban much appreciation from distressed borrowers.
Homeowners in Poland took notice, with hundreds turning out to protest in Warsaw, Poznan, and other cities, insisting the government provide help repaying their Swiss franc-denominated mortgages.
Presumably to buy votes to shore up her own election campaign, Polish prime minister Ewa Kopacz recently said, „Poland may help financially troubled holders of Swiss franc-denominated mortgages at the expense of the banks… If I have to choose between the interests of the banks and of the people who took out these loans, I will stand behind the people, but at the cost of the banks, not of the (state) budget.“
As we well know, banks will not stand for that, so public money may ultimately be the remedy here too.  It’s another case of socializing the debt through use of the state funds. Everyone ends up paying for the affected.
It is estimated that 550,000 such Swiss-denominated loans are held in Poland. That totals $36 billion, equal to a not insignificant 8% of the nation’s GDP.
Meanwhile the EU’s second-poorest member, Romania, is looking to mimic Hungarian and Polish methods in dealing with 75,000 of its own adversely affected borrowers. While in Croatia a shocking 17% of Swiss franc-denominated loans are currently non-performing.
This country could easily be next to dump consumer losses onto banks, thanks to their own large portfolios of Swiss franc-denominated loans. And we all know who will end up footing that bill too.

Geopolitical Risk Adds Yet More Concern

OK, by now you’re probably thinking:  So what?  Who cares if a bunch of Eastern European banks fail or (much more likely) get bailed out?  I say not so fast.
You see, Raiffeisen Bank International, based in Austria, has branches across Central and Eastern Europe.
Already reeling thanks to forex damage from exposure in Ukraine and Russia, Raiffeisen Bank International AG (VIE: RBI) has been one of the biggest providers of Swiss franc-denominated mortgages in Eastern Europe.
Rubbing more salt in the proverbial wound of investors in these mortgages, since January 1, new EU rules force junior bondholders to take losses before state aid can be provided.
With 4.3 billion euros of Swiss franc loans on its books, Raiffeisen, despite a recent rally due to a Ukranian ceasefire, is in a bad place.
Its stock has been in freefall since the perfect storm of Ukraine, Russia, and Eastern Europe has hit.  So it came as little surprise when management announced  a major restructuring recently, saying it would be selling operations in Poland and Slovenia, and scaling back in Russia, Ukraine, and Hungary.
Compounding matters, Raiffeisen has essentially taken a distributed risk and focused it in Austria. Banks within the Raiffeisen cooperative hold 282 billion euros of assets, reaching a mind-numbing 87% of Austrian GDP.
Can you see where this may be going?
While all this risk may look relatively benign from Wall Street, it’s very possible this crisis will come full circle. To wit, it’s not difficult to imagine the rapid escalation for the European equivalent of what was initially a U.S. financial crisis that soon spread like wildfire, quickly going global. Right now the European economy is fragile enough.
 
The last thing we need is a crisis in the world’s No. 2 currency.

About the Author

Peter Krauth is the Resource Specialist for Money Map Press and has contributed some of the most popular and highly regarded investing articles on Money Morning. Peter is headquartered in resource-rich Canada, but he travels around the world to dig up the very best profit opportunity, whether it’s in gold, silver, oil, coal, or even potash.

 

by marketoracle.co.uk

Swiss Franc Hurts Homeowners but Could Be a Boon for Investors

Housing-Market / Global Housing Markets Feb 13, 2015 – 01:28 PM GMT
Housing-Market
Peter Krauth writes: When the Swiss National Bank de-pegged from the euro last month, the fallout was massive.
One dramatic example of its impact was that felt by Miami-based hedge fund manager Everest Capital. The firm’s largest single fund lost nearly all its capital, $830 million in assets, thanks to heavy bets that the Swiss franc would decline.
Alpari UK, a foreign exchange broker, became insolvent. New York’s FXCM Inc. (NYSE: FXCM), an online foreign exchange trading firm, got a $300 million lifeline from Leucadia National Corp. (NYSE: LUK).
 
But just like the subprime mortgage debacle in the United States, small retail investors are caught in the crosshairs too.
Don’t let yourself be one.

How Europe Could Stem the Incoming Tide of Bad Loans

Few may be aware that in the 2000s, homeowners in Eastern Europe – mainly Poland, Romania, and Hungary – took out Swiss franc-denominated mortgages.
Despite warnings from policymakers and economists, these mortgages were irresistible thanks to interest rates far below those of their national currencies.
But what borrowers failed to understand (or chose to overlook) was the exchange rate risk embedded in those loans. Thanks to the recent surge in the franc against the euro and numerous other currencies, the burden of those mortgage payments has been compounded by the exchange-rate variable.
Now those mortgage holders are clamoring for help, and getting it in the most likely of places. Even better, there are companies that can profit handsomely from the situation.
Back in November, Hungary made a deal with retail banks to convert forex home mortgages into the local currency at official exchange rates. It’s a compromise deal, where homeowners gain a lot, and banks lose a bit. Sort of.
1.3 million households saw a 25% to 30% drop in their monthly payments. For their efforts, retail banks will get a 9 billion euro bailout from the central bank’s foreign currency reserves.
Needless to say, this move was hugely popular with concerned borrowers, and earned Prime Minister Orban much appreciation from distressed borrowers.
Homeowners in Poland took notice, with hundreds turning out to protest in Warsaw, Poznan, and other cities, insisting the government provide help repaying their Swiss franc-denominated mortgages.
Presumably to buy votes to shore up her own election campaign, Polish prime minister Ewa Kopacz recently said, „Poland may help financially troubled holders of Swiss franc-denominated mortgages at the expense of the banks… If I have to choose between the interests of the banks and of the people who took out these loans, I will stand behind the people, but at the cost of the banks, not of the (state) budget.“
As we well know, banks will not stand for that, so public money may ultimately be the remedy here too.  It’s another case of socializing the debt through use of the state funds. Everyone ends up paying for the affected.
It is estimated that 550,000 such Swiss-denominated loans are held in Poland. That totals $36 billion, equal to a not insignificant 8% of the nation’s GDP.
Meanwhile the EU’s second-poorest member, Romania, is looking to mimic Hungarian and Polish methods in dealing with 75,000 of its own adversely affected borrowers. While in Croatia a shocking 17% of Swiss franc-denominated loans are currently non-performing.
This country could easily be next to dump consumer losses onto banks, thanks to their own large portfolios of Swiss franc-denominated loans. And we all know who will end up footing that bill too.

Geopolitical Risk Adds Yet More Concern

OK, by now you’re probably thinking:  So what?  Who cares if a bunch of Eastern European banks fail or (much more likely) get bailed out?  I say not so fast.
You see, Raiffeisen Bank International, based in Austria, has branches across Central and Eastern Europe.
Already reeling thanks to forex damage from exposure in Ukraine and Russia, Raiffeisen Bank International AG (VIE: RBI) has been one of the biggest providers of Swiss franc-denominated mortgages in Eastern Europe.
Rubbing more salt in the proverbial wound of investors in these mortgages, since January 1, new EU rules force junior bondholders to take losses before state aid can be provided.
With 4.3 billion euros of Swiss franc loans on its books, Raiffeisen, despite a recent rally due to a Ukranian ceasefire, is in a bad place.
Its stock has been in freefall since the perfect storm of Ukraine, Russia, and Eastern Europe has hit.  So it came as little surprise when management announced  a major restructuring recently, saying it would be selling operations in Poland and Slovenia, and scaling back in Russia, Ukraine, and Hungary.
Compounding matters, Raiffeisen has essentially taken a distributed risk and focused it in Austria. Banks within the Raiffeisen cooperative hold 282 billion euros of assets, reaching a mind-numbing 87% of Austrian GDP.
Can you see where this may be going?
While all this risk may look relatively benign from Wall Street, it’s very possible this crisis will come full circle. To wit, it’s not difficult to imagine the rapid escalation for the European equivalent of what was initially a U.S. financial crisis that soon spread like wildfire, quickly going global. Right now the European economy is fragile enough.
The last thing we need is a crisis in the world’s No. 2 currency.

Here’s the Opportunity…

Clearly staying away from European bank stocks laden with both rapidly devaluing and defaulting assets is a risk-management given. Less obvious is the profit opportunity: buying in on the opposite side of the scenario to take advantage of the strength of the Swiss-franc as a result of de-pegging from the euro. Here’s how.
In well-covered news, Apple Inc. (Nasdaq: AAPL) issued $6.5 billion bonds in early February.
Of that $6.5 billion, $1.35 billion was issued in Swiss-franc denominated bonds. It was the first time Apple issued in Swiss-francs, and not surprisingly. The company smartly took advantage of the country’s low borrowing costs, driven down by the de-peg. Swiss government bonds currently are well below 0% all the way out to the 10-year mark on the yield curve.
Comparatively, Apple’s November 2024 issuance at a nominal .281% represents a fixed-income value, especially in light of a strong American dollar.
Apple also issued 15-year bonds with a .74% coupon. Again, nominal at face but at a considerable spread over much of what Europe has to offer (and with a corporate backing that ironically could prove substantially more solid than most European governments).
With the proceeds reported to fund Apple dividend payments and buybacks, investors who also hold Apple stock are in turn bolstering their equity portfolio. And profiting on the back of what might be the next big mortgage crisis.
©2014 Monument Street Publishing. All Rights Reserved. Protected by copyright laws of the United States and international treaties. Any reproduction, copying, or redistribution (electronic or otherwise, including on the world wide web), of content from this website, in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited without the express written permission of Monument Street Publishing. 105 West Monument Street, Baltimore MD 21201, Email:customerservice@moneymorning.com
Disclaimer: Nothing published by Money Morning should be considered personalized investment advice. Although our employees may answer your general customer service questions, they are not licensed under securities laws to address your particular investment situation. No communication by our employees to you should be deemed as personalized investent advice. We expressly forbid our writers from having a financial interest in any security recommended to our readers. All of our employees and agents must wait 24 hours after on-line publication, or after the mailing of printed-only publication prior to following an initial recommendation. Any investments recommended by Money Morning should be made only after consulting with your investment advisor and only after reviewing the prospectus or financial statements of the company.
Money Morning Archive
© 2005-2014 http://www.MarketOracle.co.uk – The Market Oracle is a FREE Daily Financial Markets Analysis & Forecasting online publication.
——————————————————————————————————————————————
Aus dieser Quelle zur weiteren Verbreitung entnommen: http://bankenindieschranken.blogspot.co.at/2015/01/raiffeisen-scales-down-more-than-20-to.html
 

Raiffeisen Scales Down More Than 20% to Avoid Cash Call & Raiffeisen Bond Rout Deepens as Swaps Show 70% Default Risk @ Bloomber News – Raiffeisen hit by rouble and Swiss franc

(Bloomberg) — Raiffeisen Bank International AG, eastern Europe’s second-biggest bank, will shrink by at least 20 percent to boost capital ratios and avoid a cash call that could dilute the cooperative banks that own it.
Raiffeisen, the foreign bank with the most at risk in Russia, will cut its risk-weighted assets from 79.4 billion euros ($89.6 billion) as of the end of September, the Vienna-based company said yesterday in a statement. The asset reduction will raise its core equity Tier 1 ratio, which stood at about 10 percent at the end of last year, it said.
“RBI will actively embark on a course which concentrates on strategically relevant and sustainably profitable business areas,” the bank said in the statement. “RBI comfortably fulfills all regulatory capital requirements. The Management Board of RBI emphasizes that no capital increase is planned.”
 
Trailing only UniCredit SpA in the former communist East, Raiffeisen has been struggling with the fallout of the conflict in Ukraine. On top of losses in Ukraine itself, the turmoil has hampered Raiffeisen’s Russian business, which has been its biggest profit generator since 2011. The collapse of the countries’ currencies has eaten into its capital.
The lender’s shares soared 16.7 percent to 10.51 euros at 9:25 a.m. in Vienna. Its 5.169 percent undated Tier 1 bonds gained 3.88 cents on the euro to 36.75 cents, the biggest gain since Dec. 19, while its 4.5 percent notes due February 2025 soared 7.75 cents to 59.1 cents. In percentage terms, their 15 percent jump is the biggest jump since the notes were issued a year ago.

Franc Surge

The Swiss franc’s surge is hampering one of Raiffeisen’s options for raising capital. The unit most damaged by the franc’s move is Raiffeisen Bank Polska SA, the most valuable asset it can sell.
Raiffeisen expects its Russian unit to report more than 300 million euros in profit for 2014, and to remain profitable this year even as loan-loss provisions will rise, it said in the statement. It’s not in talks to sell the unit, but Russia will be among businesses that will have to scale down, it said.
The announcement came after Raiffeisen’s shares and bonds plummeted on investor concerns it could face a capital shortfall, need a cash call, require state aid or bail in bondholders. Shares fell 3.2 percent yesterday.
Raiffeisen’s 61 percent owner is Raiffeisen Zentralbank Oesterreich AG, the central institution of Austria’s cooperative Raiffeisen banks. A dilutive share sale could have had a ripple effect through the sector and caused capital shortfalls at RZB and Raiffeisenlandesbank NOe-Wien AG, JPMorgan Chase & Co. analysts said last week.
Raiffeisen is exploring a sale of its Polish unit, two people familiar with the discussions said last month. It broke off talks to sell its Ukrainian unit when the country sank into armed conflict and froze the sale of its Hungarian business after talks last year didn’t succeed.
To contact the reporters on this story: Boris Groendahl in Vienna atbgroendahl@bloomberg.net; John Glover in London at johnglover@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Patrick Henry at phenry8@bloomberg.netJim Silver

Raiffeisen Bond Rout Deepens as Swaps Show 70% Default Risk

(Bloomberg) — Bonds of Raiffeisen Bank International AG fell for a 12th day amid investor concern they may be forced to take losses as international sanctions and the slumping oil price undermine the lender’s business in Russia.
The bank’s 500 million euros ($570 million) of 4.5 percent subordinated notes maturing in February 2025 fell 2.6 cents on the euro to a record 48 cents, taking their decline this year to about 38 percent, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Credit-default swaps on the lender’s junior debt signal a 70 percent probability of default within five years.
Raiffeisen is the foreign bank with the most at risk in Russia and the Vienna-based lender said this month that 2014 losses could be as much as 500 million euros. Under a bank resolution law that came into force Jan. 1, Austrian state aid would only be available after bondholders took losses.
 
“If they do need capital, people see the risk the government will just bail you in,” said Laurent Frings, co-head of credit research at Aberdeen Asset Management Plc in London, which oversees about $525 billion and doesn’t hold Raiffeisen bonds.
Chief Financial Officer Martin Gruell said Jan. 26 that the bank doesn’t plan to sell new shares and will continue to “comfortably meet all regulatory capital requirements.”

Coupon Payment

The company’s 307 million euros of 5.169 percent bonds jumped after Susanne Langer, a spokeswoman at Raiffeisen in Vienna, said in response to e-mailed questions that the lender expects to pay the coupon on the notes due in May. There is “no indication that the regulator will step in” to prevent payment, she said.
The bonds, issued through RZB Finance Jersey IV, rose 2.3 cents on the euro to 32.7 cents. The company has no plans for a capital increase, according to the e-mail.
Raiffeisen Bank International is the eastern European unit of a cooperative group made up of 490 local lenders and nine regional banks. Collectively, they have assets of 282 billion euros, equivalent to 87 percent of Austria’s 323 billion-euro economy.
The cost of default swaps insuring the lender’s senior bonds rose six basis points to 395 basis points, up from 260 on Jan. 2, according to prices from CMA. Contracts on its subordinated debt cost 4.2 million euros in advance and 500,000 euros annually to insure 10 million euros of bonds for five years.

Stock Drops

The company’s stock fell as much as 5.27 percent to a record 8.81 euros and was down 4 cents at 8.9 euros as of 1:50 p.m. in Vienna. The stock has lost more than 27 percent this year, reducing the lender’s market value to 2.69 billion euros.
In the first nine months of 2014, Russia contributed 55 percent of Raiffeisen’s pretax profit, before consolidation effects. That’s up from 42 percent in the full year of 2013 and 37 percent in 2012.
Losses on the bonds may have snowballed because investment banks have pulled back from trading the securities, said Robert Montague, who helps oversee about $8 billion as a senior credit analyst at ECM Asset Management in London.
“The investment banks aren’t willing to take the risk on to their books,” he said. “Nobody’s willing to catch a falling knife. Market moves are exaggerated because liquidity is so sparse.”
To contact the reporters on this story: John Glover in London atjohnglover@bloomberg.net; Boris Groendahl in Vienna at bgroendahl@bloomberg.net
To contact the editors responsible for this story: Shelley Smith atssmith118@bloomberg.net Michael Shanahan, Abigail Moses

Raiffeisen hit by rouble and Swiss franc

Raiffeisen Bank International is to slash its assets by 20 per cent, as Austria’s third-biggest lender struggles with the twin pressures of the Ukraine crisis and the dramatic appreciation of the Swiss franc.
Investors have been fretting about the impact of the decline of the rouble on Raiffeisen’s Russian business — by far its biggest source of profits — since the conflict in Ukraine escalated last year.
High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights.

 http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/90526428-a72b-11e4-8a71-00144feab7de.html#ixzz3QCWjf500

However as the Swiss franc has soared in the wake of the Swiss National Bank’s unexpected decision to stop capping it against the euro two weeks ago, investors have also begun to worry that some of Raiffeisen’s central European customers who took out loans in Swiss francs will have difficulty repaying their debts.
This cocktail of concerns is reflected in the price of Raiffeisen’s subordinated bonds. These were trading on average at about 58 cents to the euro on Wednesday, indicating that debt market investors feared a strong possibility of default. Credit-default swaps on its junior debt were trading at levels that indicated investors believed it had a 70 per cent probability of default within five years.
In an effort to reassure the market, Raiffeisen said in a statement late on Wednesday evening that its core tier one capital ratio — a closely watched measure of financial strength — stood at “approximately 10 per cent” at the end of 2014, and insisted that “no capital increase is planned”.
“In order to extend the capital buffer, a reduction of risk-weighted assets of at least 20 per cent is planned. In doing so, RBI will actively embark on a course which concentrates on strategically relevant and sustainably profitable business areas,” the bank said.
Raiffeisen said that despite the escalating financial crisis in Russia, there were no discussions taking place over the sale of its local subsidiary, and that its net profit in the country was “significantly over €300m” in 2014.
The bank also expects “a positive result” in Russia in 2015, although it conceded that it would have to raise its provisions for bad loans. It also said that the reduction in its balance sheet would “affect [its] Russian exposure”.
Raiffeisen has €22bn of exposure to Russia, equal to three times its tangible book value. “Raiffeisen’s exposure to Russia could wipe out its equity if impaired,” said Eleni Papoula, analyst at Berenberg, who estimates the bank will take another €4bn of writedowns on Russia.
Last year, the Austrian bank completed a €2.8bn rights issue to bolster its capital levels ahead of the European Central Bank’s stress tests. But its shares have lost more than half their value since then and the bank is constrained from doing a further share issue by its co-operative ownership structure.
Raiffeisen is 60 per cent owned by a co-operative group that is ultimately owned by 1.7m Austrian private individuals, adding to the political sensitivity around the fortunes of the group.

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/90526428-a72b-11e4-8a71-00144feab7de.html#axzz3QCWFOmQ7

Raiffeisen details exposure to Swiss franc loans

Jan 15 (Reuters) – Raiffeisen Bank International’s biggest exposure to Swiss franc loans in central and eastern Europe is in Poland but it also has some corporate loans in Hungary, emerging Europe’s number two lender said on Thursday.

 

The bank said, in an emailed response to an enquiry about the Swiss National Bank’s decision to let the franc rise, that it had around 2.9 billion euros ($3.38 billion) of Swiss franc loans in Poland, 360 million in Romania, 270 million in Croatia, 80 million in Serbia as of the end of September and a remaining position of about 220 million francs of mainly corporate loans in Hungary.

 

„We currently do not forecast the effects of the (Swiss franc) appreciation on our asset quality, as we still have to see at which level the exchange rates will stabilise.“ the bank said. (1 Swiss franc = 1.0000 Swiss francs) ($1 = 0.8593 euros) (Reporting byMichael Shields; Editing by Elaine Hardcastle)

MORE INFO:
AS WELL WITH LOGO :
——————————————————————————————————————————————

 Aus dieser Quelle zur weiteren Verbreitung entnommen: http://bankenindieschranken.blogspot.co.at/2015/01/exklusiv-raiffeisen-konzern-lli-mehl.html

Exklusiv: Raiffeisen-Konzern LLI – Mehl & Muehle auch schwer unter Druck

Schlechte Nachrichten aus dem Raiffeisen-Reich: Das Segment Mehl & Mühle sorgt im Leipnik-Lundenburger-Konzern für massive Probleme. Um positiv bilanzieren zu können, mussten 144 Millionen € Rücklagen aufgelöst werden.

LLI-Chef Josef Pröll muss bei der Tochter Goodmills massive Abschreibungen vornehmen / Bild: PEROUTKA Guenther / WB
Wien. Kein Tag ohne schlechte Nachrichten aus demRaiffeisen-Sektor: Nicht nur die Raiffeisen BankInternational hat schwer mit den Folgen der Russland-Krise und der schwachen Osteuropakonjunktur zu kämpfen-auch der Leipnik-Lundenburger-(LLI)-Konzern steht stark unter Druck. Die zu Raiffeisen Niederösterreich-Wien gehörende und von Ex-ÖVP-Finanzminister Josef Pröll geleitete Beteiligungsgruppe weist in der Bilanz 2013/14 (per 30. September) ein Ergebnis der gewöhnlichen Geschäftstätigkeit von minus 124,2 Millionen € aus. Damit unter dem Strich ein Gewinn von 20,88 Millionen € herauskommt, mussten Rücklagen in Höhe von rund 144 Millionen € aufgelöst werden. Konkret: 85,3 Millionen € Kapitalrücklagen, 55,5 Millionen € freie Gewinn-und 3,8 Millionen € sonstige unversteuerte Rücklagen.
Restrukturierungen
Notwendig war dies, weil der in den Bereichen Mehl & Mühle, Vendig (Automaten-Catering), Frucht sowie Zucker aktive Konzern, der auch 38 Prozent an den Casinos Austria hält, schwere Probleme mit den Mehl-&-Mühle-Beteiligungen vor allem in Osteuropa hat. Diese sind in LLI-Tochter Goodmills Group zusammengefasst, zu der auch das Mühlengeschäft in Österreich und Deutschland gehört. Im Segment Mehl &Mühle ging der Umsatz im abgelaufenen Geschäftsjahr um 137,9 Millionen € bzw. 14,1 Prozent auf 842,9 Millionen € zurück. Laut Lagebericht war das „vor allem auf gesunkene Verkaufspreise in Folge der reduzierten Getreidepreise zurückzuführen“. Schwerer wiegt aber, dass „infolge umfangreicher, Restrukturierungen und organisatorischer Umstrukturierungen‘ eine außerordentliche Abschreibung des Beteiligungsansatzes der LLI an der Goodmills Group in Höhe von 138,4 Millionen € erforderlich war.
Die restliche Abschreibung betrifft die Raiffeisen Agrar Holding, deren Buchwert zum Bilanzstichtag unter dem Marktwert lag. Die außerordentlichen Abschreibungen verringerten zudem das Eigenkapital der Gesellschaft laut Bericht „essentiell“. In Summe sank es von 454,9 Millionen € auf 322,66 Millionen €.Der LLI-Gesamtumsatz ging von 1,1 Milliarden € auf 1,007 Milliarden zurück.
Vorstandschef Pröll, seit Mitte 2011 beim Unternehmen, war auf WirtschaftsBlatt-Anfrage wegen seines dichten Terminplans nicht erreichbar. Laut seinem Sprecher habe man sich „von Altlasten getrennt“. In einer eilig vorbereiteten Pressemitteilung wird das EGT mit minus 67,1 Millionen € – nach IFRS, was auch Konzernmaßstab sei-ausgewiesen.
Pröll wird in der Mitteilung damit zitiert, dass man „mit dem Managementwechsel bei Goodmills ein Screening und eine Bewer tung der Perspektiven für das Unternehmen vorgenommen“ habe: „Ich halte es für richtig, die Dinge offen auf den Tisch zu legen, zu bereinigen, einen neuen Boden einzuziehen und auf diesem in Zukunft erfolgreich zu sein.“
Ob dies gelingt, ist offen: Dem Lagebericht entsprechend rechnet man 2014/15 „mit keiner deutlichen Veränderung der wirtschaftlichen Lage“. Der Expansionskurs der letzten Jahre soll fortgesetzt werden. Ziel sei „eine positive Umsatzentwicklung und eine signifikante Ergebnissteigerung“. Am 16.12. beschloss die LLI indes, Goodmills 24 Millionen € Darlehen zu gewähren.
0,64 € Dividende
Damit die Leipnik-Lundenburger-Aktionäre  trotz dieser unerfreulichen Lage nicht durch die Finger schauen, wurde in der jüngsten Hauptversammlung eine Dividende von 0,64 € je Aktie beschlossen. Insgesamt sind 32,624.283 Stück im Umlauf. Laut HV-Protokoll sollen die rund 20,88 Millionen € Gewinn an die LLI-Eigentümer am 27. Februar 2015 ausgeschüttet werden.
Chef-und Aufseherbezüge
Trotz der schwierigen Lage kann sich die Gewinnausschüttung von 20,88 Millionen € an die LLI-Aktionäre sehen lassen: Die größten sind mit 50,05 Prozent die Raiffeisen-Holding NÖ-Wien und die RZB. Letztere hält 33,06 Prozent und ist indirekt auch über die 2,2 Prozent der Uniqa und die 7,98 Prozent der Raiffeisen Versicherung beteiligt. Weitere 6,89 Prozent hält der niederösterreichische Rübenbauernbund. Auffallend ist, dass der LLI-Bilanzgewinn im Abschreibungsjahr 2013/14 um knapp 1,3 Millionen € höher ausfällt als 2012/13.
Höher ausgewiesen sind in der Bilanz auch die Bezüge des dreiköpfigen LLI-Vorstands rund um Josef Pröll. Sie stiegen im Vergleich zum vorigen Geschäftsjahr von 868.000 € auf 989.000 €. Laut Prölls Sprecher sind darin aber 375.000 € für variable Vorstandsvergütungen inkludiert, die aber nicht ausbezahlt würden.
Die Bezüge für den LLI-Aufsichtsrat (Vorsitz: Christian Konrad, Mitglieder: Walter Rothensteiner [Stv.], Klaus Buchleitner, Erwin Hameseder und Gottfried Wanitschek) stiegen von 153.000 € auf 160.000 €.
—————————————————————————————————————————————–
Aus dieser Quelle zur weiteren Verbreitung entnommen: http://bankenindieschranken.blogspot.co.at/2015/01/es-geht-tiefer-raiffeisen-aktie-knallt.html

Es geht tiefer: Raiffeisen-Aktie knallt auf 9,30 Euro

Europaweit rasseln am Dienstag Bank-Aktien nach unten. Das Papier der Raiffeisen Bank International handelte im Nachmittagsverlauf durchgehend bei 9,50 Euro, schloss allerdings darunter.

Bild: HERBERT NEUBAUER / APA
Wien/Athen. Die Ratingagentur Moody’s droht Griechenland nach dem Wahlsieg der linken Syriza-Partei mit einer Herabstufung der Bonität. Der Wahlausgang erhöhe die Wachstums-, Finanzierungs- und Liquiditätsrisiken, erklärte Moody’s am Dienstag. Derzeit bewertet die Agentur die griechische Kreditwürdigkeit mit Caa1. Das bedeutet hohe Ausfallrisiken für Gläubiger, die ihr Geld nur bei günstiger Entwicklung zurückbekommen. Erst am Montag hatte die Ratingagentur S&P mit einer Herabstufung gedroht. An der Börse in Athen gehen die Aktien der griechischen Institute Piraeus, Alpha Bank, Eurobank und National Bank of Greece in die Knie. Die vier Titel büssen jeweils mehr als 10 Prozent ein.
Für so gut wie alle europäischen Bankaktien ist es ein roter Dienstag. In Wien verliert die Aktie der Erste Group am Ende etwas mehr als ein Prozent, die Raiffeisen Bank International kracht um über sechs Prozent südwärts. Bitter. Denn während die 9,50 Euro im Verlauf des Nachmittags immer wieder als Unterstützung dienten, wurde diese in den letzten 30 Handelsminuten dann doch noch unterboten.  Es ist erneut ein Rekordtief für die RBI-Aktie, die beim Börsegang vor knapp 10 Jahren um 32,50 Euro an Anleger verkauft worden war. Die Ostbank der Giebelkreuzer ist an der Börse keine 2,8 Milliarden Euro wert – und damit weniger, als bei der Rekord-Kapitalerhöhung vor einem Jahr eingenommen worden war.
An der Wiener Börse gibt es freilich auch erfreuliche Kursbewegungen, allerdings nur wenige: Im Plus schließen lediglich die Telekom Austria und Lenzing. 
RBI weist Verkaufsgerüchte um Russlandtochter zurück
Die RBI hat am Dienstag neuerlich aufgeflammte Gerüchte um einen Verkauf ihrer russischen Tochterbank zurückgewiesen. Davor war am Montag die russische Alfa Bank für die RBI-Tochter ins Gespräch gebracht worden. RBI-Chef Karl Sevelda spricht im „Standard“ von „Gerüchten, die jeder Grundlage entbehren“.
Es gebe „überhaupt keinen Kontakt“ zur Alfa Group und auch „überhaupt keine Intention, unsere russische Bank zu verkaufen“, wird Sevelda in der Zeitung vom Dienstag zitiert. Bisher war das Russlandgeschäft der größte Ertragsbringer für die Raiffeisen Bank International.
Die Russian Media Monitoring Agency WPS hatte sich am Montag auf die Internetplattform banki.ru berufen, die von Verhandlungen der RBI mit der russischen Alfa-Bank rund um den Milliardär Mikhail Fridman wissen will. Die Verhandlungen würden bereits seit Herbst 2014 laufen und sollten ursprünglich bis Jahresende beendet werden, schrieb WPS. Dieser Zeitplan sei gescheitert nun werde als Abschluss für das erste Quartal 2015 angepeilt, so der „Standard“. All diese Darstellungen wies die RBI zurück.
Im WirtschaftsBlatt wird ebenfalls über einen möglichen Verkauf von Familiensilber spekuliert, als eine Option zur Kapitalstärkung, nachdem eine weitere Kapitalerhöhung bei der RBI nicht zur Debatte stehe. Derzeit stünden alle Tochterunternehmen auf dem Prüfstand, im ersten Halbjahr 2015 sollen Ergebnisse präsentiert werden. Schwierig wäre ein Verkauf des Ukraine- sowie des Ungarn-Geschäfts, zumindest würde die RBI keinen vernünftigen Preis dafür bekommen. Also müssen, so heißt es, mitunter erfolgreichere Beteiligungen abgegeben werden: Töchter, die eine Eigenkapitalgröße von 500 bis 600 Millionen Euro ausweisen und dazu noch Gewinne schreiben. Darunter fallen dem Bericht nach unter anderem jene in der Slowakei, in Tschechien, Rumänien, Kroatien oder auch Serbien. Wirtschaftsblatt
—————————————————————————————————————————————–

Aus dieser Quelle zur weiteren Verbreitung entnommen: http://bankenindieschranken.blogspot.co.at/2015/01/raiffeisen-anleihen-die-angst-vor.html

Raiffeisen-Anleihen – Die Angst vor Verlusten geht um

 

Raiffeisen ist nicht nur am Aktienmarkt unter Druck, auch am Bondmarkt: Zum zwölften Mal am Stück sind die Anleihen der börsennotierten Raiffeisen Bank International (RBI) am Mittwoch gefallen. Laut „Bloomberg“ fürchten Investoren, dass ihnen Verluste drohen, weil Sanktionen und Ölpreisverfall das Geschäft in Russland untergraben würden.

Raiffeisen-Logo in Wien – Die Anleihen der RBI signalisieren eine Ausfallswahrscheinlichkeit von 70 Prozent
Raiffeisen-Logo in Wien – Die Anleihen der RBI signalisieren eine Ausfallswahrscheinlichkeit von 70 Prozent / Bild: Reuters
Die RBI ist die am stärksten engagierte Auslandsbank in Russland. Eine 2025 fällige 500-Millionen-Euro-Nachranganleihe (Kupon: 4,5 Prozent) fiel dem Bericht zufolge um 2,6 Cent auf ein neues Rekordtief von 48 Cent, womit sie in dem Jahr schon rund 38 Prozent verloren habe. Credit Default Swaps (CDS) auf Nachrangpapiere der RBI würden innerhalb der nächsten fünf Jahre eine Ausfallswahrscheinlichkeit von 70 Prozent signalisieren.
Der Aberdeen-Analyst Laurent Frings gibt in dem Bericht Marktbefürchtungen wider: „Wenn sie Kapital brauchen, sehen Anleger das Risiko, dass der Staat sie in die Haftung nimmt.“
Die Bank hat laut Bloomberg am Mittwoch aber festgehalten, dass auch der im Mai fällige (gewinnabhängige, Anm.) Kupon auf eine 307-Millionen-Anleihe bezahlt wird. Es gebe keine Indikation, dass die Auszahlung vonseiten der Aufseher verhindert würde, wurde Banksprecherin Susanne Langer zitiert. Das gab der betreffenden Anleihe Auftrieb.
Die RBI-Aktie hat am Mittwoch wieder verloren und notierte am Nachmittag zeitweise unter 9 Euro. Eine neuerliche Kapitalerhöhung (Aktienemission) hat der Vorstand zuletzt in Abrede gestellt. Man werde komfortabel alle regulatorischen Kapitalanforderungen erfüllen.
In einer auf der Homepage veröffentlichten Prospekt-Ergänzung, datiert vom 12. Dezember 2014, hat die RBI zur Kapitalstärkung bzw. zum Risikoabbau namentlich Verbriefungsaktivitäten genannt. Zum Ende des Jahres 2014 werde man aller Voraussicht nach Vermögenswerte im Wert von ca. 1 bis 1,5 Milliarden Euro verbrieft haben, schrieb die Bank im Prospektnachtrag. Dies würde zu einer Reduktion der risikogewichteten Aktiva (RWA) um rund 500 Mio. Euro und einer Entlastung der Kapitalquote (CET1 Ratio) von 50 Millionen oder 0,07 Prozent führen. Die Bank hat auch vor, künftig Vermögenswerte von 3 bis 4 Mrd. Euro jährlich zu verbriefen, was wieder zu einer Reduktion der RWA um rund 1,5 Mrd. Euro und zu einer Entlastung der CET1 Ratio von 0,20 Prozent pro Jahr führen solle.
Am Kapital gezehrt haben die Währungsabwertungen in Russland und der Ukraine, wird auch im Prospektnachtrag per Ende 2014 eingeräumt. Die Rubel- und Griwna-Abwertungen könnten demnach die „CET1-Quote“ (also die von Basel III geforderte Kernkapitalquote) unter das Niveau von 10 Prozent fallen lassen. wirtschaftsblatt

————————————————————————————————
Aus dem per ÖVP-Amtsmissbräuche offenkundig verfassungswidrig agrar-ausgeraubten Tirol, vom friedlichen Widerstand, Klaus Schreiner

Don´t be part of the problem! Be part of the solution. Sei dabei! Gemeinsam sind wir stark und verändern unsere Welt! Wir sind die 99 %!

Übrigens die 39. Innsbrucker Friedensmahnwache findet am Montag den 16.02.2015 um 18:00 Uhr bei der Annasäule statt. Sei dabei! Unterstütze mit Deiner Anwesenheit die friedliche Bewegung FÜR Frieden in Europa und auf der ganzen Welt.

Share Button

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.